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NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 : Print Culture and the Modern World

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NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 Print Culture and the Modern World: This article includes free NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5: Print Culture and the Modern World.

It has been developed by the subject matter experts at GFG, according to the latest CBSE Syllabus 2023-24, and guidelines to help the students of Class 10 create a solid conceptual base for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 Print Culture and the Modern World.

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 : Print Culture and the Modern World

The history of the print industry has formed our modern world and a future without printed material is difficult to imagine today. These NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science are valuable tools that may assist you in covering the whole curriculum and in-depth examination of the concepts.

The solutions to all the exercises in NCERT Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 : Print Culture and the Modern World have been collectively covered in NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Social Science.

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5: Print Culture and the Modern World

Write in Brief.

Q 1.  Give reasons for the following-

a) Woodblock print only came to Europe after 1295.

Ans. a)
Italian traveler Marco Polo traveled to China and studied the art of woodblock printing. He carried this information back with him when he left Italy in 1295. This information gradually migrated from Italy and spread to the rest of Europe.

b) Martin Luther was in favor of print and spoke out in praise of it.

Ans. b)
Martin Luther, a Christian reformer, composed ninety-five theses in 1517 that protested the Catholic Church’s immoral practices and pinned them on the Wittenberg church door. The printing of thousands of copies of Luther’s theses quickly diffused his views across society. The force of printing sparked the Reformation movement and eventually gave rise to Protestantism, which profoundly touched Martin Luther.

c) The Roman Catholic Church began keeping an Index of Prohibited books in the mid-sixteenth century.

Ans. c)
From the middle of the 16th century onward, the Roman Catholic Church encountered numerous dissenters. There are several books that people have written that offer their unique interpretations of God and the universe. As a result, the church forbade such books and kept a list of them. It was known as the Index of Prohibited Books.

d) Gandhi said the fight for Swaraj is a fight for liberty of speech, liberty of the press, and freedom of association.

Ans. d)
Gandhi ji believed that liberty of speech, liberty of the press, and freedom of association were the three most effective means of forming and expressing public opinion. Thus, he said that the struggle for Swaraj was a struggle for the liberty of speech, press, and freedom of association.

Q 2.  Write short notes to show what you know about.

a)  The Gutenberg Press

Ans. a)
The earliest printing press in Europe was the Gutenberg Press. It was created by Strasbourg-born Johannes Gutenberg. He had knowledge of and expertise in running olive and wine presses because he was raised on an enormous agricultural estate. The Bible was the first book produced using the printing press, which he created in the year 1448.

b) Erasmus’s idea of the printed book

Ans b)
The printing of books alarmed the Latin scholar Erasmus, who feared that it would encourage the spread of books with rebellious views. He believed that while certain books may provide important knowledge, the bulk of literature might only be useless or irrational, serving as a vehicle for disseminating controversial or irreligious notions that would ultimately cause a revolt.

c) The Vernacular Press Act

Ans c)
The 1857 revolt prompted the government to restrict journalistic freedom. Based on the Irish Press Laws, the Vernacular Press Act was passed in 1878. It gave the government broad authority to restrict articles and commentaries published in the local press. The local newspapers issued in various regions began to be regularly monitored by the government. When a story was deemed to be seditious, the newspapers received a warning; if the warning was disregarded, the press and printing equipment were placed under seizure.

Q 3. What did the spread of print culture in nineteenth-century India mean to-

a) Women

Ans a)
Women gained the same prominence as authors and readers. Reading habits among them improved. Women developed a keen interest in reading and writing as literacy levels rose. The significance of women’s education began to be emphasized in several journals. For women specifically, a lot of newspapers and books were released. Women had some freedom to study and form their own opinions on a variety of topics thanks to the print culture, especially when it came to matters specifically affecting women.

b) The poor

Ans b)
Due to the affordable prices of books, impoverished people benefited from the growth of print culture. The release of inexpensive books boosted the number of readers among them. Beginning in the early 19th century, public libraries were also established, increasing everyone’s access to the literature necessary for education. The social reformers inspired and encouraged others, including industrial employees, who established libraries, and some even published books.

c) Reformers

Ans c)
The most effective way for Indian reformers of the 19th century to spread their ideas and draw attention to ethical situations was through print culture. They started printing numerous vernacular, English, and Hindi newspapers and literature so they could inform the general people of the nation about their views on widow immolation, child marriage, monotheism, the Brahmanical priesthood, and idolatry. In this way, the development of print culture in the 19th century gave them a platform to challenge religious beliefs and disseminate contemporary social and political ideologies among speakers of many national languages.
 

Discuss.

Q 1. Why did some people in eighteenth-century Europe think that print culture would bring enlightenment and end despotism?

Ans 1)
Many people in 18th-century Europe believed that print culture has the ability to spread enlightenment and put an end to despotism. This would promote literacy as well as understanding among all social classes. Social reformers like Louise, Sebastian Mercier, and Martin Luther believed that print culture is the most potent driver of development and public opinion and that, as a result, it will undoubtedly bring enlightenment and put an end to despotism.

Q 2. Why did some people fear the effect of easily available printed books? Choose one example from Europe and one from India.

Ans 2)
Because of the widespread adoption of reading among ordinary people, certain people, particularly from the upper class, were concerned about the impact of widely accessible printed books. They were concerned that they might lose their authority or position. Some individuals worried that it might fuel the rise of insurrections and irrational ideas.

Through the Index of Prohibited Publications, the Roman Catholic Church attempted to restrict printed publications throughout Europe.
The Vernacular Press Act in India, however, placed limits on the Indian press and a number of local publications.

Q 3. What were the effects of the spread of print culture for poor people in nineteenth-century India?

Ans 3)
Printed literature, particularly for enjoyment, started to reach even the impoverished in India in the 19th century as literacy rates rose. Publishers began putting forth inexpensive, compact books. At intersections, these novels were for sale. Rich individuals and Christian missionaries founded public libraries. Folklore and stories might be heard by those who couldn’t read.

Q 4.  Explain how print culture assisted the growth of nationalism in India.

Ans 4) 
In India, the development of nationalism was greatly aided by print culture in the following ways:

  1. The oppressive practices of colonial control were documented through the vernacular press.
  2. Nationalist ideals that wanted journalistic freedom were encouraged by government misrule and its initiative to restrict it.
  3. The newspapers covertly propagated nationalist sentiments and revolutionary notions.
  4. The print culture contributed to the people’s education, which allowed them to become gradually more open to the reformist and nationalist ideologies of the various Indian leaders.

It is clear how print culture contributed to India’s growing nationalism in these ways.

Key Topics of NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 Print Culture and the Modern World:

  • The First Printed Books
  • Print Comes to Europe
  • The Print Revolution and Its Impact
  • The Reading Mania
  • The Nineteenth Century
  • India and the World of Print
  • Religious Reform and Public Debates
  • New Forms of Publication
  • Print and Censorship

To learn about NCERT Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 : Print Culture and the Modern World from scratch , head over to : CBSE Class 10 History Notes Chapter 5 :  Print Culture and the Modern World

Also Check:

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 : Print Culture and the Modern World – FAQs

Q 1. What is covered in NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 : Print Culture and the Modern World?

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 : Print Culture and the Modern World provides a detailed explanation of the history of print and how it spread from its origins in East Asia to Europe and India. This chapter does a good job of explaining how print impacted social life and civilizations and how technology expanded. 

Q 2. What are the important topics in NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 : Print Culture and the Modern World?

These are the important topics in NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 : Print Culture and the Modern World:

  • The First Printed Books
  • Print Comes to Europe
  • The Print Revolution and Its Impact
  • The Reading Mania
  • The Nineteenth Century
  • India and the World of Print
  • Religious Reform and Public Debates
  • New Forms of Publication
  • Print and Censorship

Q 3. How can NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 Print Culture and the Modern World benefit students?


NCERT Solutions for Class 10 History Social Science Chapter 5 : Print Culture and the Modern World will help you learn about a wide range of subjects. Students of Class 10 will find it easier to handle the board examination syllabus. They can study systematically and do better in exams with the help of these solutions.



Last Updated : 15 Nov, 2023
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