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Difference Between Purines And Pyrimidines

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Purines and pyrimidines are the two types of nitrogenous bases that make up the building blocks of DNA and RNA. These bases are responsible for encoding genetic information, and understanding the differences between purines and pyrimidines is crucial in understanding the structure and function of DNA and RNA.

Purines and Pyrimidines

Differences between Purines and Pyrimidines

Difference between Purine and Pyrimidie are as follows:

 Characteristics

Purines

Pyrimidines

StructureContain two carbon-nitrogen rings fused togetherContain a single carbon-nitrogen ring
Nitrogenous Bases in DNAAdenine (A) and Guanine (G)Cytosine (C), Thymine (T), and Uracil (U)
Nitrogenous Bases in RNAAdenine (A) and Guanine (G)Cytosine (C), Uracil (U)
Base PairingA pairs with T (DNA) or U (RNA) and G pairs with CC pairs with G and T (DNA) or U (RNA) pairs with A
Number of Nitrogen AtomsContain four nitrogen atoms in their structureContain two nitrogen atoms in their structure
Function in DNA/RNAServe as the building blocks for genetic materialServe as the building blocks for genetic material
Hydrogen BondingCan form hydrogen bonds with pyrimidinesCan form hydrogen bonds with purines

What are Purines?

Purines are one of the two types of nitrogenous bases found in DNA and RNA. They have a double-ring structure consisting of a six-membered ring fused to a five-membered ring. The two purines found in DNA and RNA are adenine (A) and guanine (G). These nitrogenous bases are essential for the formation of hydrogen bonds between complementary base pairs, which help stabilize the double helix structure of DNA.

What are Pyrimidines?

Pyrimidines are the other type of nitrogenous base found in DNA and RNA. They have a single-ring structure consisting of a six-membered ring. The three pyrimidines found in DNA and RNA are cytosine (C), thymine (T), and uracil (U). Cytosine and thymine are found in DNA, while cytosine and uracil are found in RNA. The nitrogenous base pairing rules dictate that adenine pairs with thymine (or uracil in RNA) and cytosine pairs with guanine.

Similarities Between Purines and Pyrimidines

Table comparing the similarities between purines and pyrimidines:

 Features

Purines

Pyrimidines

Nitrogenous Bases in DNAAdenine (A) and Guanine (G)Cytosine (C), Thymine (T), and Uracil (U)
Chemical CompositionContain two carbon-nitrogen rings fused togetherContain a single carbon-nitrogen ring
Nitrogenous Bases in RNAAdenine (A) and Guanine (G)Cytosine (C), Uracil (U)
Hydrogen BondingCan form hydrogen bonds with pyrimidinesCan form hydrogen bonds with purines
Function in DNA/RNAServe as the building blocks for genetic materialServe as the building blocks for genetic material
Number of Nitrogen AtomsContain four nitrogen atoms in their structureContain two nitrogen atoms in their structure

Conclusion

Purines and pyrimidines are the two types of nitrogenous bases found in DNA and RNA. Purines have a double-ring structure and consist of adenine and guanine, while pyrimidines have a single-ring structure and consist of cytosine, thymine, and uracil. Understanding the differences between purines and pyrimidines is crucial in understanding the structure and function of DNA and RNA. The base pairing rules between purines and pyrimidines are essential for the replication and transcription of genetic material.

FAQs on Purines and Pyrimidines

1. What are Purines and Pyrimidines?

Answer:

Purines and pyrimidines are important molecules that make up the genetic material in living organisms.

2. What is the difference between Purines and Pyrimidines?

Answer:

Purines have two rings in their structure while pyrimidines have one ring. Purines are also heavier and contain more nitrogen and carbon atoms.

3. What is the Function of Purines and Pyrimidines in DNA and RNA?

Answer:

Purines and pyrimidines are the building blocks of genetic material and are essential for the proper functioning and replication of DNA and RNA.

4. Are Purines and Pyrimidines found in other Biological molecules?

Answer:

Yes, purines and pyrimidines are found in other molecules like ATP, which is a molecule that provides energy to cells.

5. What is the difference between purine and pyrimidine synthesis?

Answer:

Purine and pyrimidine are mainly synthesise via both de novo and salvage pathway. But purine mainly synthesie by salvage and pyrimidine via de-novo synthesis.



Last Updated : 28 Aug, 2023
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