Difference between Kubernetes and Docker Swarm

Containers are brilliant at packaging and holding all of application codes, dependencies, libraries, and necessary configurations in a way that you can run it anywhere easily. But problem arises of fact that containers themselves cannot do things like: load balancing, provisioning hosts, distributing containers across multiple servers, scaling up and down of a cluster, etc. So concept of containerization platforms comes into picture.

1. Google Kubernetes :
Kubernetes is Google’s open-source, portable, and extensible take on container orchestration system for managing and dealing with containerized workloads that facilitate both declarative configuration and automation. Kubernetes came into picture in 2014 as an open-source project by Google. Kubernetes takes into account over 15 years of Google’s experience running production loads at scale with best of ideas and practices from community.

2. Docker Swarm :
Docker Swarm is a group of physical/virtual machines that are meant for running Docker application and have been configured with perspective of joining together to form a cluster. Docker Swarm is native clustering tool for Docker that has been part of core since version 1.12. It lets you manage and organize a cluster of Docker nodes, and allows you to interact with them like a single system. It provides optimality for your IT resources by scheduling containers to run on aptest host, balancing workloads to make sure that containers are loaded/launched where there are enough resources. All of this is done while maintaining performance standards that you define.



Differences between Kubernetes and Swarm Docker :

S.No. Kubernetes Docker Swarm
1. It was developed by Google in 2014. It was developed by Docker, Inc. in 2013.
2. Installation of Kubernetes requires a series of manual steps and configurations to tie together its components such as etcd, flannel and docker engine. Docker installation is easy as any application which is available on package manager system on OS you are using. Docker just accounts for one-liner command on Linux platforms like Debian, Ubuntu and CentOS for it’s installation.
3. It uses its own unique client, API and YAML definitions each differing from that of standard Docker equivalents. Swarm API provides much of familiar/known functionalities from Docker, but functionalities provided are limited and so it does not fully encompass all of it’s constituting commands.
4. Its complexity stems offer a unified set of APIs and facilitate strong guarantees to cluster states but at expense of speed, due to which, container deployment and scaling is slower. On other hand, provides faster container deployment even in very large clusters and due to this high cluster fill stages support faster reaction times to scaling on demand.
5. It enables/facilitates load balancing through manual service configuration, ie. containers pods need to be defined as services for load balancing. It provides built-in/automated internal load balancing through connections between any node and container in cluster.
6. It handles updates progressively. Each container is updated one by one(one at a time) to make sure availability of service is at all times. If something goes wrong during updation, a working version will be rolled back automatically. In the case of Docker, it can apply updates to nodes incrementally. If anything goes wrong, you can easily roll back to previous working version of service.
7. It volumes serves as an abstraction to allow containers (volumes) to be created and removed together with pod they are enclosed in. Containers share data within the same pod. Its data volumes are basically created separately or together with containers, so that they can be shared between multiple containers.
8. It supports multiple types of logging/monitoring services like Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK) logs within container, Heapster/Grafana/Influx, Sysdig cloud integration and Node health. It mainly supports monitoring services with third-party tools such as Reimann.
9. It mainly uses flannel to setup it’s container networking. TLS authentication requires manual configuration for security purposes. It facilitates multi-host ingress network overlay for container networking, running on all cluster nodes. TLS authentication is automatically configured.
10. It relies on etcd and containers that are manually defined as services for discovery. A DNS server is a strongly recommended add-on to watch Kubernetes API. It makes service discovery relatively easier. By default, containers are given their own unique IPs, which allows them to communicate through virtual private IP addresses in cluster-specific ingress network.
11. It supports a more complex, flexible architecture with stronger service guarantees due to which performance slows down. On other hand, supports a simpler architecture, so in terms of sheer speed, it always has an added advantage.

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