Difference between Decoder and Demultiplexer

Decoder:
This Decoder is a combinational logic circuit and its purpose is to decode the data given to it. It is made of n number of input lines and 2*n number of output lines. For every probable input condition, there are various output signals and depending on the input only one output signal will produce the logic. So, this n-to-2n decoder is also called as min-term generator where each output outcomes only at particular input.

Demultiplexer:
This Demultiplexer is kind of same to the decoder, but it contains select lines as well. It is used to send the single input over the multiple output lines. It accepts data from one input signal and transferred it over the provided number of output lines. It contains data input line, select lines and output lines.

Difference between Decoder and Demultiplexer:



S.No. Comparison Decoder Demultiplexer
1. Basic These are Logic circuit which decodes an encrypted input stream from one to another format. It is a Combination circuit which routes a single input signal to one of several output signals.
2. Input/Output n number of input lines and 2n number of output lines. n number of select lines and 2n number of output lines.
3. Inverse of Encoder. Multiplexer.
4. Application In Detection of bits, data encoding. In Distribution of the data, switching.
5. Use It is used for changing the format of the instruction in the machine specific language. It is used as a routing device to route the data coming from one signal into multiple signals.
6. Select Lines Not contains. Contains.
7. Implementation Majorly implemented in the networking application. Employed in data-intensive applications where data need to be changed into another form.



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