Collections.UserString in Python

Strings are the arrays of bytes representing Unicode characters. However, Python does not support the character data type. A character is a string of length one.

Example:

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# Python program to demonstrate
# string
  
# Creating a String  
# with single Quotes 
String1 = 'Welcome to the Geeks World'
print("String with the use of Single Quotes: "
print(String1) 
    
# Creating a String 
# with double Quotes 
String1 = "I'm a Geek"
print("\nString with the use of Double Quotes: "
print(String1) 

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Output:

String with the use of Single Quotes: 
Welcome to the Geeks World

String with the use of Double Quotes: 
I'm a Geek

Note: For more information, refer to Python String

Collections.UserString

Python supports a String like a container called UserString present in the collections module. This class acts as a wrapper class around the string objects. This class is useful when one wants to create a string of their own with some modified functionality or with some new functionality. It can be considered as a way of adding new behaviors for the string. This class takes any argument that can be converted to string and simulates a string whose content is kept in a regular string. The string is accessible by the data attribute of this class.



Syntax:

collections.UserString(seq)

Example 1:

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# Python program to demonstrate
# userstring
  
  
from collections import UserString
  
  
d = 12344
  
# Creating an UserDict
userS = UserString(d)
print(userS.data)
  
  
# Creating an empty UserDict
userS = UserString("")
print(userS.data)

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Output:

12344

Example 2:

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# Python program to demonstrate
# userstring
   
  
from collections import UserString
   
  
# Creating a Mutable String
class Mystring(UserString):
      
    # Function to append to
    # string
    def append(self, s):
        self.data += s
          
    # Function to rmeove from 
    # string
    def remove(self, s):
        self.data = self.data.replace(s, "")
      
# Driver's code
s1 = Mystring("Geeks")
print("Original String:", s1.data)
  
# Appending to string
s1.append("s")
print("String After Appending:", s1.data)
  
# Removing from string
s1.remove("e")
print("String after Removing:", s1.data)

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Output:

Original String: Geeks
String After Appending: Geekss
String after Removing: Gkss



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