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time.strftime() function in Python

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  • Last Updated : 29 Jul, 2022
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As time module provides various time-related functions. So it is necessary to import the time module otherwise it will through error because of the definition of time.strftime(format[, t]) is present in time module.
time.strftime(format[, t]) function convert a tuple or struct_time representing a time as returned by gmtime() or localtime() to a string as specified by the format argument. 
If t is not provided, the current time as returned by localtime() is used. The format must be a string. ValueError is raised if any field in t is outside of the allowed range.
Note: 
0 is a legal argument for any position in the time tuple; if it is normally illegal the value is forced to a correct one.
 

Syntax: time.strftime(format[, t])
Parameters : 
t – time in number of seconds to be formatted 
format – This is of string type. i.e. the directives can be embedded in the format string.
Return value: None

There are many directives that can be embedded in the format string, you can refer them here
Notes:
 

  • When used with the strptime() function, the %p directive only affects the output hour field if the %I directive is used to parse the hour.
  • The range really is 0 to 61; value 60 is valid in timestamps representing leap seconds and value 61 is supported for historical reasons.
  • When used with the strptime() function, %U and %W are only used in calculations when the day of the week and the year are specified.

Below is the implementation:
 

Python3




# Program To show How can we use different derivatives
# Multiple at a time and single at a time
 
 
# importing the srtftime() and gmtime()
# if not used the gm time, time changes
# to the local time
 
from time import gmtime, strftime
 
# using simple format of showing time
s = strftime("%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S + 1010", gmtime())
print("Example 1:", s)
 
print()
 
# only change in this is the full names
# and the representation
s = strftime("%A, %D %B %Y %H:%M:%S + 0000", gmtime())
print("Example 2:", s)
 
print()
 
# this will show you the preferred date time format
s = strftime("%c")
print("Example 3:", s)
 
print()
 
# this will tell about the centuries
s = strftime("%C")
print("Example 4:", s)
 
print()
 
# MOTY: month of the year
# DOTY: Day of the year
# Simple representation
# % n - new line
s = strftime("%A, %D %B %Y, %r, %nMOTY:%m %nDOTY:% j")
print("Example 5:", s)
 
print()
 
# % R - time in 24 hour notation
s = strftime(" %R ")
print("Example 6:", s)
 
print()
 
# % H - hour, using a 24-hour clock (00 to 23) in Example 1, 2, 3
# % I - hour, using a 12-hour clock (01 to 12)
s = strftime("%a, %d %b %Y %I:%M:%S + 0000", gmtime())
print("Example 7:", s)
 
print()
 
# % T - current time, equal to % H:% M:% S
s = strftime("%r, %T ", gmtime())
print("Example 8:", s)
 
print()
 
# % u an % U use (see difference)
s = strftime("%r, %u, %U")
print("Example 9:", s)
 
print()
 
# use of % V, % W, % w
s = strftime("%r, %V, %W, %w")
print("Example 10:", s)
 
print()
 
# use of % x, % X, % y, % Y
s = strftime("%x, %X, %y, %Y")
print("Example 11:", s)
 
print()
 
# use of % Z, % z
s = strftime("%r, %z, %Z")
print("Example 12:", s)

Output: 

Example 1: Tue, 25 Jun 2019 10:09:52 + 1010

Example 2: Tuesday, 06/25/19 June 2019 10:09:52 + 0000

Example 3: Tue Jun 25 10:09:52 2019

Example 4: 20

Example 5: Tuesday, 06/25/19 June 2019, 10:09:52 AM, 
MOTY:06 
DOTY:% j

Example 6:  10:09 

Example 7: Tue, 25 Jun 2019 10:09:52 + 0000

Example 8: 10:09:52 AM, 10:09:52 

Example 9: 10:09:52 AM, 2, 25

Example 10: 10:09:52 AM, 26, 25, 2

Example 11: 06/25/19, 10:09:52, 19, 2019

Example 12: 10:09:52 AM, +0000, UTC

 


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