Graph representations using set and hash

We have introduced Graph implementation using array of vectors in Graph implementation using STL for competitive programming | Set 1. In this post, a different implementation is used which can be used to implement graphs using sets. The implementation is for adjacency list representation of graph.

A set is different from a vector in two ways: it stores elements in a sorted way, and duplicate elements are not allowed. Therefore, this approach cannot be used for graphs containing parallel edges. Since sets are internally implemented as binary search trees, an edge between two vertices can be searched in O(logV) time, where V is the number of vertices in the graph.

Following is an example of an undirected and unweighted graph with 5 vertices.
8



Below is adjacency list representation of this graph using array of sets.
9

Below is the code for adjacency list representation of an undirected graph using sets:

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// A C++ program to demonstrate adjacency list
// representation of graphs using sets
#include <bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;
  
struct Graph {
    int V;
    set<int, greater<int> >* adjList;
};
  
// A utility function that creates a graph of V vertices
Graph* createGraph(int V)
{
    Graph* graph = new Graph;
    graph->V = V;
  
    // Create an array of sets representing
    // adjacency lists.  Size of the array will be V
    graph->adjList = new set<int, greater<int> >[V];
  
    return graph;
}
  
// Adds an edge to an undirected graph
void addEdge(Graph* graph, int src, int dest)
{
    // Add an edge from src to dest.  A new
    // element is inserted to the adjacent
    // list of src.
    graph->adjList[src].insert(dest);
  
    // Since graph is undirected, add an edge
    // from dest to src also
    graph->adjList[dest].insert(src);
}
  
// A utility function to print the adjacency
// list representation of graph
void printGraph(Graph* graph)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < graph->V; ++i) {
        set<int, greater<int> > lst = graph->adjList[i];
        cout << endl << "Adjacency list of vertex "
             << i << endl;
  
        for (auto itr = lst.begin(); itr != lst.end(); ++itr)
            cout << *itr << " ";
        cout << endl;
    }
}
  
// Searches for a given edge in the graph
void searchEdge(Graph* graph, int src, int dest)
{
    auto itr = graph->adjList[src].find(dest);
    if (itr == graph->adjList[src].end())
        cout << endl << "Edge from " << src
             << " to " << dest << " not found."
             << endl;
    else
        cout << endl << "Edge from " << src
             << " to " << dest << " found."
             << endl;
}
  
// Driver code
int main()
{
    // Create the graph given in the above figure
    int V = 5;
    struct Graph* graph = createGraph(V);
    addEdge(graph, 0, 1);
    addEdge(graph, 0, 4);
    addEdge(graph, 1, 2);
    addEdge(graph, 1, 3);
    addEdge(graph, 1, 4);
    addEdge(graph, 2, 3);
    addEdge(graph, 3, 4);
  
    // Print the adjacency list representation of
    // the above graph
    printGraph(graph);
  
    // Search the given edge in the graph
    searchEdge(graph, 2, 1);
    searchEdge(graph, 0, 3);
  
    return 0;
}

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Output:

Adjacency list of vertex 0
4 1

Adjacency list of vertex 1
4 3 2 0

Adjacency list of vertex 2
3 1

Adjacency list of vertex 3
4 2 1

Adjacency list of vertex 4
3 1 0

Edge from 2 to 1 found.

Edge from 0 to 3 not found.

Pros: Queries like whether there is an edge from vertex u to vertex v can be done in O(log V).



Cons:

  • Adding an edge takes O(log V), as opposed to O(1) in vector implementation.
  • Graphs containing parallel edge(s) cannot be implemented through this method.

Further Optimization of Edge Search Operation using unordered_set (or hashing):
The edge search operation can be further optimized to O(1) using unordered_set which uses hashing internally.

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// A C++ program to demonstrate adjacency list
// representation of graphs using sets
#include <bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;
  
struct Graph {
    int V;
    unordered_set<int>* adjList;
};
  
// A utility function that creates a graph of 
// V vertices
Graph* createGraph(int V)
{
    Graph* graph = new Graph;
    graph->V = V;
  
    // Create an array of sets representing
    // adjacency lists. Size of the array will be V
    graph->adjList = new unordered_set<int>[V];
  
    return graph;
}
  
// Adds an edge to an undirected graph
void addEdge(Graph* graph, int src, int dest)
{
    // Add an edge from src to dest. A new
    // element is inserted to the adjacent
    // list of src.
    graph->adjList[src].insert(dest);
  
    // Since graph is undirected, add an edge
    // from dest to src also
    graph->adjList[dest].insert(src);
}
  
// A utility function to print the adjacency
// list representation of graph
void printGraph(Graph* graph)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < graph->V; ++i) {
        unordered_set<int> lst = graph->adjList[i];
        cout << endl << "Adjacency list of vertex "
             << i << endl;
  
        for (auto itr = lst.begin(); itr != lst.end(); ++itr)
            cout << *itr << " ";
        cout << endl;
    }
}
  
// Searches for a given edge in the graph
void searchEdge(Graph* graph, int src, int dest)
{
    auto itr = graph->adjList[src].find(dest);
    if (itr == graph->adjList[src].end())
        cout << endl << "Edge from " << src
             << " to " << dest << " not found."
             << endl;
    else
        cout << endl << "Edge from " << src
             << " to " << dest << " found."
             << endl;
}
  
// Driver code
int main()
{
    // Create the graph given in the above figure
    int V = 5;
    struct Graph* graph = createGraph(V);
    addEdge(graph, 0, 1);
    addEdge(graph, 0, 4);
    addEdge(graph, 1, 2);
    addEdge(graph, 1, 3);
    addEdge(graph, 1, 4);
    addEdge(graph, 2, 3);
    addEdge(graph, 3, 4);
  
    // Print the adjacency list representation of
    // the above graph
    printGraph(graph);
  
    // Search the given edge in the graph
    searchEdge(graph, 2, 1);
    searchEdge(graph, 0, 3);
  
    return 0;
}

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Output :

Adjacency list of vertex 0
4 1 

Adjacency list of vertex 1
4 3 2 0 

Adjacency list of vertex 2
3 1 

Adjacency list of vertex 3
4 2 1 

Adjacency list of vertex 4
3 1 0 

Edge from 2 to 1 found.

Edge from 0 to 3 not found.

Pros:

  • Queries like whether there is an edge from vertex u to vertex v can be done in O(1).
  • Adding an edge takes O(1).

Cons:

  • Graphs containing parallel edge(s) cannot be implemented through this method.
  • Edges are not stored in any order.

Note : adjacency matrix representation is the most optimized for edge search, but space requirements of adjacency matrix are comparatively high for big sparse graphs. Moreover adjacency matrix has other disadvantages as well like BFS and DFS become costly as we can’t quickly get all adjacent of a node.

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