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Java Spring Boot Microservices Example – Step by Step Guide

Last Updated : 21 Dec, 2023
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Microservices is an architectural approach to build a collection of logic, data layers, and loosely coupled applications. Every microservices deals with one business function end-to-end independently from other microservices. Microservices present simple and understandable APIs to communicate with each other through lightweight common protocols such as HTTP. With the increasing demand for Microservices Architecture Patterns in the industry the popularity of Spring Boot is also increasing because when it comes to Microservices Development, Spring Boot is the first choice of every developer. Spring Boot is a microservice-based framework that makes a production-ready application in significantly less time. By using Spring Boot, you can make your microservices smaller and it will run faster. For this reason, Spring Boot has become the standard for Java microservices. In this article, we will create a simple Microservice using Spring Boot.

Step-by-Step Guide

Step 1: Create a New Spring Boot Project in Spring Initializr

To create a new Spring Boot project, please refer to How to Create a Spring Boot Project in Spring Initializr and Run it in IntelliJ IDEA. For this project choose the following things

  • Project: Maven
  • Language: Java
  • Packaging: Jar
  • Java: 17

 Please choose the following dependencies while creating the project.

  • Spring Boot DevTools
  • Spring Data JPA
  • MySQL Driver
  • Spring Web

Generate the project and run it in IntelliJ IDEA by referring to the above article.

Note: We have used the MySQL database in this project.

Step 2: Create Schema in MySQL Workbench and Put Some Sample Data

Go to your MySQL Workbench and create a schema named gfgmicroservicesdemo and inside that create a table called employee and put some sample data as shown in the below image. Here we have created 4 columns and put some sample data.

  1. id
  2. name
  3. email
  4. age

Spring-Boot-Microservices-1-(2)

Now we are going to fetch Employee Data from Employee Table in our Spring Boot project. To do it refer to the following steps. Before moving to IntelliJ IDEA let’s have a look at the complete project structure for our Microservices.

Spring-Boot-Microservices-3

Step 3: Make Changes in Your application.properties File

Now make the following changes in your application.properties file.

spring.datasource.url=jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/gfgmicroservicesdemo
spring.datasource.username=put your username here
spring.datasource.password=put your password here

You may also refer to the below image:

Spring-Boot-Microservices-21

Step 4: Create Your Entity/Model Class

Go to the src > main > java > entity and create a class Employee and put the below code. This is our model class.

Java




package com.gfg.employeaap.entity;
 
import jakarta.persistence.*;
 
@Entity
@Table(name = "employee")
public class Employee {
 
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
    @Column(name = "id")
    private int id;
 
    @Column(name = "name")
    private String name;
 
    @Column(name = "email")
    private String email;
 
    @Column(name = "age")
    private String age;
 
    public int getId() {
        return id;
    }
 
    public void setId(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
 
    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }
 
    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
 
    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }
 
    public void setEmail(String email) {
        this.email = email;
    }
 
    public String getAge() {
        return age;
    }
 
    public void setAge(String age) {
        this.age = age;
    }
}


Step 5: Create Your Repository Interface

Go to the src > main > java > repository and create an interface EmployeeRepo and put the below code. This is our repository where we write code for all the database-related stuff.

Java




package com.gfg.employeaap.repository;
 
import com.gfg.employeaap.entity.Employee;
import org.springframework.data.jpa.repository.JpaRepository;
 
public interface EmployeeRepo extends JpaRepository<Employee, Integer> {
 
}


Note: Please refer to this article to know more about JpaRepository.

Step 6: Create an EmployeeResponse Class

Go to the src > main > java > response and create a class EmployeeResponse and put the below code.

Java




package com.gfg.employeaap.response;
 
public class EmployeeResponse {
 
    private int id;
    private String name;
    private String email;
    private String age;
 
    public int getId() {
        return id;
    }
 
    public void setId(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
 
    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }
 
    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
 
    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }
 
    public void setEmail(String email) {
        this.email = email;
    }
 
    public String getAge() {
        return age;
    }
 
    public void setAge(String age) {
        this.age = age;
    }
}


Step 7: Create Your Service Class

Go to the src > main > java > service and create a class EmployeeService and put the below code. This is our service class where we write our business logic.

Java




package com.gfg.employeaap.service;
 
import com.gfg.employeaap.entity.Employee;
import com.gfg.employeaap.repository.EmployeeRepo;
import com.gfg.employeaap.response.EmployeeResponse;
import org.modelmapper.ModelMapper;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
 
import java.util.Optional;
 
public class EmployeeService {
 
    @Autowired
    private EmployeeRepo employeeRepo;
 
    @Autowired
    private ModelMapper mapper;
 
    public EmployeeResponse getEmployeeById(int id) {
        Optional<Employee> employee = employeeRepo.findById(id);
        EmployeeResponse employeeResponse = mapper.map(employee, EmployeeResponse.class);
        return employeeResponse;
    }
 
}


Step 8: Create an Employee Controller

Go to the src > main > java > controller and create a class EmployeeController and put the below code. Here we are going to create an endpoint “/employees/{id}” to find an employee using id.

Java




package com.gfg.employeaap.controller;
 
import com.gfg.employeaap.response.EmployeeResponse;
import com.gfg.employeaap.service.EmployeeService;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.http.HttpStatus;
import org.springframework.http.ResponseEntity;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.GetMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PathVariable;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;
 
@RestController
public class EmployeeController {
 
    @Autowired
    private EmployeeService employeeService;
 
    @GetMapping("/employees/{id}")
    private ResponseEntity<EmployeeResponse> getEmployeeDetails(@PathVariable("id") int id) {
        EmployeeResponse employee = employeeService.getEmployeeById(id);
        return ResponseEntity.status(HttpStatus.OK).body(employee);
    }
 
}


Step 9: Create a Configuration Class

Go to the src > main > java > configuration and create a class EmployeeConfig and put the below code.

Java




package com.gfg.employeaap.configuration;
 
import com.gfg.employeaap.service.EmployeeService;
import org.modelmapper.ModelMapper;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
 
@Configuration
public class EmployeeConfig {
 
    @Bean
    public EmployeeService employeeBean() {
        return new EmployeeService();
    }
 
    @Bean
    public ModelMapper modelMapperBean() {
        return new ModelMapper();
    }
 
}


Note: You may refer to these two articles

Before running the Microservice below is the complete pom.xml file. Please cross-verify if you have missed some dependencies

XML




<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
         xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0
                        https://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
    <parent>
        <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
        <version>3.0.2</version>
        <relativePath/> <!-- lookup parent from repository -->
    </parent>
    <groupId>com.gfg.employeaap</groupId>
    <artifactId>employee-service</artifactId>
    <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <name>employee-service</name>
    <description>Employee Service</description>
    <properties>
        <java.version>17</java.version>
    </properties>
    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-jpa</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId>
        </dependency>
 
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-devtools</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
            <optional>true</optional>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>com.mysql</groupId>
            <artifactId>mysql-connector-j</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-test</artifactId>
            <scope>test</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.modelmapper</groupId>
            <artifactId>modelmapper</artifactId>
            <version>3.1.1</version>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>
 
    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
                <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>
 
</project>


Step 10: Run Your Employee Microservice

To run your Employee Microservice src > main > java > EmployeeServiceApplication and click on the Run button. If everything goes well then you may see the following screen in your console. Please refer to the below image.

Spring-Boot-Microservices-4

Step 11: Test Your Endpoint in Postman

Now open Postman and hit the following URL:

GET: http://localhost:8080/employees/1

And you can see the following response:

{
"id": 1,
"name": "Amiya",
"email": "ar@gmail",
"age": "25"
}

Please refer to the below image:

Spring-Boot-Microservices-5

This is how we have built our Employee Microservice with the help of Java and Spring Boot. And you can also design all your endpoints and write all the business logic, database logic, etc in the corresponding files.



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