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Difference between ArrayList, LinkedList and Vector

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ArrayList:

Array List is an implemented class of List interface which is present in package java.util. Array List is created on the basis of the growable or resizable array. And Array List is an index-based data structure. In ArrayList, the element is stored in a contiguous location.  It can store different data types. And random access is allowed. We can also store the duplicate element in Array List. It can store any number of null values.

 Below is the implementation of ArrayList:

C++

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
 
using namespace std;
 
int main()
{
    // Creating a vector of int type
    vector<int> vec;
 
    // Appending new elements
    // at the end of the vector
    // using push_back() method via for loops
    for (int i = 1; i <= 5; i++)
        vec.push_back(i);
 
    // Printing the vector
    for (int i = 0; i < vec.size(); i++)
        cout << vec[i] << " ";
    cout << endl;
 
    // Removing an element at index 3
    // from the vector
    // using erase() method
    vec.erase(vec.begin() + 3);
 
    // Printing the vector after
    // removing the element
    for (int i = 0; i < vec.size(); i++)
        cout << vec[i] << " ";
    cout << endl;
 
    return 0;
}
// This code is contributed by Akash Jha

                    

Java

// Java program to Illustrate working of an ArrayList
 
// Importing required classes
import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
 
// Main class
class GFG {
 
    // Main driver method
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        // Creating an ArrayList of Integer type
        ArrayList<Integer> arrli = new ArrayList<Integer>();
 
        // Appending the new elements
        // at the end of the list
        // using add () method via for loops
        for (int i = 1; i <= 5; i++)
            arrli.add(i);
 
        // Printing the ArrayList
        System.out.println(arrli);
 
        // Removing an element at index 3
        // from the ArrayList
        // using remove() method
        arrli.remove(3);
 
        // Printing the ArrayList after
        // removing the element
        System.out.println(arrli);
    }
}

                    

Python3

# Creating a list of integers
my_list = []
 
# Appending new elements to the list using for loop
for i in range(1, 6):
    my_list.append(i)
 
# Printing the list
print(my_list)
 
# Removing an element at index 3 from the list
my_list.pop(3)
 
# Printing the list after removing the element
print(my_list)

                    

C#

// C# program to Illustrate working of an ArrayList
 
// Importing required namespaces
using System;
using System.Collections;
 
// Main class
class GFG {
    // Main driver method
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Creating an ArrayList of integer type
        ArrayList arrli = new ArrayList();
        // Appending the new elements
        // at the end of the list
        // using Add() method via for loops
        for (int i = 1; i <= 5; i++)
            arrli.Add(i);
 
        // Printing the ArrayList
        foreach(int i in arrli) Console.Write(i + " ");
        Console.WriteLine();
 
        // Removing an element at index 3
        // from the ArrayList
        // using RemoveAt() method
        arrli.RemoveAt(3);
 
        // Printing the ArrayList after
        // removing the element
        foreach(int i in arrli) Console.Write(i + " ");
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}
// This code is contributed by Akash Jha

                    

Javascript

let vec = [];
 
// Appending new elements
// at the end of the vector
// using push() method via for loops
for (let i = 1; i <= 5; i++) {
vec.push(i);
}
 
// Printing the vector
for (let i = 0; i < vec.length; i++) {
console.log(vec[i] + " ");
}
console.log("\n");
 
// Removing an element at index 3
// from the vector
// using splice() method
vec.splice(3, 1);
 
// Printing the vector after
// removing the element
for (let i = 0; i < vec.length; i++) {
console.log(vec[i] + " ");
}
console.log("\n");
 
//This code is contributed by Akash Jha

                    

Output
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
[1, 2, 3, 5]

Linked List:

Linked list is a linear data structure where data are not stored sequentially inside the computer memory but they are link with each other by the address. The best choice of linked list is deletion and insertion and worst choice is retrieval . In Linked list random access is not allowed . It traverse through iterator. 

 Below is the implementation of the LinkedList:

C++

#include <iostream>
 
// LinkedList class definition
class LinkedList {
 public:
  // Node structure definition within LinkedList class
  struct Node {
    int data;
    Node *next;
    // Node constructor
    Node(int d) : data(d), next(nullptr) {}
  };
 
  // Pointer to head node
  Node *head;
 
  // Constructor
  LinkedList() : head(nullptr) {}
 
  // Function to print the linked list
  void printList() {
    // Pointer to traverse the linked list
    Node *n = head;
    while (n != nullptr) {
      // Print the data of the node
      std::cout << n->data << " ";
      // Move to the next node
      n = n->next;
    }
  }
};
 
// Main function
int main() {
  // Create an instance of the LinkedList class
  LinkedList llist;
 
  // Create three nodes with data 1, 2 and 3
  llist.head = new LinkedList::Node(1);
  LinkedList::Node *second = new LinkedList::Node(2);
  LinkedList::Node *third = new LinkedList::Node(3);
 
  // Connect the first node with the second node
  llist.head->next = second;
  // Connect the second node with the third node
  second->next = third;
 
  // Call the printList function to print the linked list
  llist.printList();
 
  return 0;
 
}

                    

Java

import java.util.*;
 
// LinkedList class definition
class LinkedList {
 
  // Node class definition within LinkedList class
  static class Node {
    int data;
    Node next;
    // Node constructor
    Node(int d) {
      this.data = d;
      next = null;
    }
  }
 
  // Pointer to head node
  Node head;
 
  // Constructor
  LinkedList() {
    head = null;
  }
 
  // Function to print the linked list
  void printList() {
    // Pointer to traverse the linked list
    Node n = head;
    while (n != null) {
      // Print the data of the node
      System.out.print(n.data + " ");
      // Move to the next node
      n = n.next;
    }
  }
}
 
// Main class
public class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    // Create an instance of the LinkedList class
    LinkedList llist = new LinkedList();
 
    // Create three nodes with data 1, 2 and 3
    llist.head = new LinkedList.Node(1);
    LinkedList.Node second = new LinkedList.Node(2);
    LinkedList.Node third = new LinkedList.Node(3);
 
    // Connect the first node with the second node
    llist.head.next = second;
    // Connect the second node with the third node
    second.next = third;
 
    // Call the printList function to print the linked list
    llist.printList();
    //This code is Contributed by Abhijit Ghosh
  }
}

                    

Python3

class LinkedList:
    # Node structure definition within LinkedList class
    class Node:
        def __init__(self, data):
            self.data = data
            self.next = None
 
    def __init__(self):
        # Pointer to head node
        self.head = None
 
    def printList(self):
        # Pointer to traverse the linked list
        n = self.head
        while n is not None:
            # Print the data of the node
            print(n.data, end=' ')
            # Move to the next node
            n = n.next
 
 
if __name__ == '__main__':
    # Create an instance of the LinkedList class
    llist = LinkedList()
 
    # Create three nodes with data 1, 2 and 3
    llist.head = LinkedList.Node(1)
    second = LinkedList.Node(2)
    third = LinkedList.Node(3)
 
    # Connect the first node with the second node
    llist.head.next = second
    # Connect the second node with the third node
    second.next = third
 
    # Call the printList function to print the linked list
    llist.printList()

                    

C#

// C# program to define a LinkedList class
 
using System;
 
// LinkedList class definition
class LinkedList {
    // Node structure definition within LinkedList class
    public class Node {
      public int data;
      public Node next;
      // Node constructor
      public Node(int d) {
        data = d;
        next = null;
        }
    }
    // Pointer to head node
    public Node head;
 
    // Constructor
    public LinkedList() {
        head = null;
    }
 
    // Function to print the linked list
    public void PrintList() {
        // Pointer to traverse the linked list
        Node n = head;
        while (n != null) {
            // Print the data of the node
            Console.Write(n.data + " ");
            // Move to the next node
            n = n.next;
        }
    }
}
 
// Main function
class GFG {
static void Main() {
    // Create an instance of the LinkedList class
    LinkedList llist = new LinkedList();
        // Create three nodes with data 1, 2 and 3
        llist.head = new LinkedList.Node(1);
        LinkedList.Node second = new LinkedList.Node(2);
        LinkedList.Node third = new LinkedList.Node(3);
 
        // Connect the first node with the second node
        llist.head.next = second;
        // Connect the second node with the third node
        second.next = third;
 
        // Call the PrintList function to print the linked list
        llist.PrintList();
    }
}

                    

Javascript

class Node {
constructor(data) {
this.data = data;
this.next = null;
}
}
 
class LinkedList {
constructor() {
this.head = null;
}
 
printList() {
let n = this.head;
while (n != null) {
console.log(n.data + " ");
n = n.next;
}
}
}
 
let llist = new LinkedList();
llist.head = new Node(1);
let second = new Node(2);
let third = new Node(3);
 
llist.head.next = second;
second.next = third;
 
llist.printList();
 
//This code is contributed by Akash Jha

                    

Output
1 2 3 

Vector:

The Vector class implements a growable array of objects. Vectors fall in legacy classes, but now it is fully compatible with collections. It is found in java.util package and implement the List interface

 Below is the implementation of the Vector:

C++

#include <iostream>
#include<vector>
using namespace std;
 
int main()
{
   // Size of the Vector
int n = 5;
// Declaring the Vector with
// initial size n
vector<int> v;
 
// Appending new elements at
// the end of the vector
for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++)
    v.push_back(i);
 
// Printing elements
for(auto i : v)
    cout<<i<<" ";
cout<<endl;
 
// Remove element at index 3
v.erase(v.begin()+3);
 
// Displaying the vector
// after deletion
for(auto i : v)
    cout<<i<<" ";
cout<<endl;
 
return 0;
}

                    

Java

// Java Program to Demonstrate Working
// of Vector Via Creating and using it
 
// Importing required classes
import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
 
// Main class
class GFG {
 
    // Main driver method
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        // Size of the Vector
        int n = 5;
 
        // Declaring the Vector with
        // initial size n
        Vector<Integer> v = new Vector<Integer>(n);
 
        // Appending new elements at
        // the end of the vector
        for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++)
            v.add(i);
 
        // Printing elements
        System.out.println(v);
 
        // Remove element at index 3
        v.remove(3);
 
        // Displaying the vector
        // after deletion
        System.out.println(v);
 
        // iterating over vector elements
        // using for loop
        for (int i = 0; i < v.size(); i++)
 
            // Printing elements one by one
            System.out.print(v.get(i) + " ");
    }
}

                    

Python3

# Size of the List
n = 5
 
# Declaring the List with initial size n
v = []
 
# Appending new elements at the end of the list
for i in range(1, n + 1):
    v.append(i)
 
# Printing elements
print(v)
 
# Remove element at index 3
v.pop(3)
 
# Displaying the list after deletion
print(v)
 
# Iterating over list elements using a for loop
for i in range(len(v)):
    # Printing elements one by one
    print(v[i], end=" ")

                    

C#

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
 
namespace ConsoleApp {
class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Size of the List
        int n = 5;
        // Declaring the List with
        // initial size n
        List<int> lst = new List<int>();
        // Appending new elements at
        // the end of the List
        for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++)
            lst.Add(i);
 
        // Printing elements
        foreach(var i in lst) Console.Write(i + " ");
        Console.WriteLine();
 
        // Remove element at index 3
        lst.RemoveAt(3);
 
        // Displaying the List
        // after deletion
        foreach(var i in lst) Console.Write(i + " ");
        Console.WriteLine();
 
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
}
//This code is contributed by Akash Jha

                    

Javascript

// Size of the Array
let n = 5;
// Declaring the Array with initial size n
let v = [];
 
// Appending new elements at the end of the Array
for (let i = 1; i <= n; i++)
    v.push(i);
 
// Printing elements
console.log(v.join(" "));
 
// Remove element at index 3
v.splice(3, 1);
 
// Displaying the Array after deletion
console.log(v.join(" "));

                    

Output
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
[1, 2, 3, 5]
1 2 3 5 

Difference between Array List, Linked List, and Vector:

SubjectArray ListLinked ListVector
synchronizedNot presentNot presentpresent
Random accessAllowedNot AllowedAllowed
Memory Locationcontiguous Not contiguous contiguous 
Null valuessupportssupportssupports
Data structureDynamic ArrayDoubly Linked ListDynamic Array
Duplicate allowedYesYesYes
OperationInsertion and deletion are slowInsertion and deletion are fastInsertion and deletion are slow

Which one is better among Linked list, Array list, or Vector?

It depends on the specific use case, each of these data structures has its own advantages and trade-offs. If you mostly need to insert and delete elements at the start or middle of the container, then a linked list might be a better option. If you need fast random access and are willing to accept slower insertion and deletion at end positions, an Array List or Vector is a better option.



Last Updated : 10 Nov, 2023
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