Top MCQs on Searching Algorithm with Answers

Last Updated : 27 Sep, 2023

Searching Algorithms are designed to check for an element or retrieve an element from any data structure where it is stored. More on Searching Algorithms

Quiz On Searching Algorithms

Quiz On Searching Algorithms

Question 1

Linear search is also called------

Cross

Random Search

Tick

Sequential search

Cross

Perfect search

Cross

None



Question 1-Explanation: 

Linear Search is defined as a sequential search algorithm that starts at one end and goes through each element of a list until the desired element is found, otherwise, the search continues till the end of the data set.

Hence Option (B) is the correct answer.

Question 2

Which of the following is correct recurrence for worst case of Binary Search?

Cross

T(n) = 2T(n/2) + O(1) and T(1) = T(0) = O(1)

Cross

T(n) = T(n-1) + O(1) and T(1) = T(0) = O(1)

Tick

T(n) = T(n/2) + O(1) and T(1) = T(0) = O(1)

Cross

T(n) = T(n-2) + O(1) and T(1) = T(0) = O(1)



Question 2-Explanation: 

Following is a typical implementation of Binary Search. 

// Searches x in arr[low..high].  If x is present, then returns its index, else -1
int binarySearch(int arr[], int low, int high, int x)
{
    if(high >= low)
    {
        int mid = low + (high - low)/2;
        if (x == arr[mid])
            return mid;
        if (x> arr[mid])
            return binarySearch(arr, (mid + 1), high);
        else
            return binarySearch(arr, low, (mid -1));
    }

    return -1;
}

In Binary Search, we first compare the given element x with middle of the array. If x matches with middle element, then we return middle index. Otherwise, we either recur for left half of array or right half of array. So recurrence is T(n) = T(n/2) + O(1)

Hence Option(C) is the correct answer

Question 3

Given a sorted array of integers, what can be the minimum worst-case time complexity to find ceiling of a number x in given array? The ceiling of an element x is the smallest element present in array which is greater than or equal to x. Ceiling is not present if x is greater than the maximum element present in array. For example, if the given array is {12, 67, 90, 100, 300, 399} and x = 95, then the output should be 100.

Cross

O(loglogn)

Cross

O(n)

Tick

O(log(n))

Cross

O(log(n) * log(n))



Question 3-Explanation: 

We modify the standard binary search to find the ceiling. The time complexity T(n) can be written as T(n) <= T(n/2) + O(1) Solution of the above recurrence can be obtained by Master Method. It falls in case 2 of the Master Method. The solution is O(Logn). 

int ceilSearch(int arr[], int low, int high, int x)
{
    int mid;

    /* If x is smaller than or equal to the first element,
      then return the first element */
    if (x <= arr[low])
        return low;

    /* If x is greater than the last element, then return -1
     */
    if (x > arr[high])
        return -1;

    /* get the index of middle element of arr[low..high]*/
    mid = (low + high) / 2; /* low + (high - low)/2 */

    /* If x is same as middle element, then return mid */
    if (arr[mid] == x)
        return mid;

    /* If x is greater than arr[mid], then either arr[mid +
      1] is ceiling of x or ceiling lies in
      arr[mid+1...high] */
    else if (arr[mid] < x) {
        if (mid + 1 <= high && x <= arr[mid + 1])
            return mid + 1;
        else
            return ceilSearch(arr, mid + 1, high, x);
    }

    /* If x is smaller than arr[mid], then either arr[mid]
       is ceiling of x or ceiling lies in arr[mid-1...high]
     */
    else {
        if (mid - 1 >= low && x > arr[mid - 1])
            return mid;
        else
            return ceilSearch(arr, low, mid - 1, x);
    }
}

Hence Option(C) is the correct answer.

Question 4

Consider the following C program that attempts to locate an element x in an array Y[] using binary search. The program is erroneous. (GATE CS 2008) 

C

1.   f(int Y[10], int x) {
2.     int i, j, k;
3.     i = 0; j = 9;
4.     do {
5.             k =  (i + j) /2;
6.             if( Y[k] < x)  i = k; else j = k;
7.         } while(Y[k] != x && i < j);
8.     if(Y[k] == x) printf ("x is in the array ") ;
9.     else printf (" x is not in the array ") ;
10. }

On which of the following contents of Y and x does the program fail?

Cross

Y is [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10] and x < 10

Cross

Y is [1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19] and x < 1

Tick

Y is [2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2] and x > 2

Cross

Y is [2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20] and 2 < x < 20 and x is even



Question 4-Explanation: 

The above program doesn’t work for the cases where the element to be searched is the last element of Y[] or greater than the last element (or maximum element) in Y[]. For such cases, the program goes in an infinite loop because i is assigned value as k in all iterations, and i never becomes equal to or greater than j. So while the condition never becomes false.

Hence Option (C) is the correct option.

Question 5

C++

1. f(int Y[10], int x) {
2.     int i, j, k;
3.     i = 0; j = 9;
4.     do {
5.             k =  (i + j) /2;
6.             if( Y[k] < x)  i = k; else j = k;
7.         } while(Y[k] != x && i < j);
8.     if(Y[k] == x) printf ("x is in the array ") ;
9.     else printf (" x is not in the array ") ;
10. }

In the above question, the correction needed in the program to make it work properly is (GATE CS 2008)

Tick

Change line 6 to: if (Y[k] < x) i = k + 1; else j = k-1;

Cross

Change line 6 to: if (Y[k] < x) i = k - 1; else j = k+1;

Cross

Change line 6 to: if (Y[k] <= x) i = k; else j = k;

Cross

Change line 7 to: } while ((Y[k] == x) && (i < j));



Question 5-Explanation: 

Below is the corrected function 

f(int Y[10], int x) {
   int i, j, k;
   i = 0; j = 9;
   do {
           k =  (i + j) /2;
           if( Y[k] < x)  i = k + 1; else j = k - 1;
       } while(Y[k] != x && i < j);
   if(Y[k] == x) printf (\"x is in the array \") ;
   else printf (\" x is not in the array \") ;
}

Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_search_algorithm#Implementations

Hence Option(A) is the correct option.

Question 6

Which of the following is the correct recurrence for the worst case of Ternary Search?

Tick

   T(n) = T(n/3) + 4, T(1) = 1

Cross

  T(n) = T(n/2) + 2,  T(1) = 1

Cross

  T(n) = T(n + 2) + 2,  T(1) = 1

Cross

  T(n) = T(n - 2) + 2,  T(1) = 1



Question 6-Explanation: 

Following is a typical implementation of Binary Search. 

// A recursive ternary search function. It returns location of x in
// given array arr[l..r] is present, otherwise -1
int ternarySearch(int arr[], int l, int r, int x)
{
if (r >= l)
{
		int mid1 = l + (r - l)/3;
		int mid2 = mid1 + (r - l)/3;

		// If x is present at the mid1
		if (arr[mid1] == x) return mid1;

		// If x is present at the mid2
		if (arr[mid2] == x) return mid2;

		// If x is present in left one-third
		if (arr[mid1] > x) return ternarySearch(arr, l, mid1-1, x);

		// If x is present in right one-third
		if (arr[mid2] < x) return ternarySearch(arr, mid2+1, r, x);

		// If x is present in middle one-third
		return ternarySearch(arr, mid1+1, mid2-1, x);
}
// We reach here when element is not present in array
return -1;
}

In ternary search, we divide the given array into three parts and determine which has the key (searched element). We can divide the array into three parts by taking mid1 and mid2 which can be calculated as shown below. Initially, l and r will be equal to 0 and n-1 respectively, where n is the length of the array. So the recurrence relation is    T(n) = T(n/3) + 4, T(1) = 1

Hence Option (A) is the correct answer.

Question 7

Consider the C function given below. Assume that the array listA contains n (> 0) elements, sorted in ascending order. 

C

int ProcessArray(int *listA, int x, int n)
{
    int i, j, k;
    i = 0;
    j = n-1;
    do
    {
        k = (i+j)/2;
        if (x <= listA[k])
            j = k-1;
        if (listA[k] <= x)
            i = k+1;
    }
    while (i <= j);
    if (listA[k] == x)
        return(k);
    else
        return -1;
}

Which one of the following statements about the function ProcessArray is CORRECT?

Cross

It will run into an infinite loop when x is not in listA.

Tick

It is an implementation of binary search.

Cross

It will always find the maximum element in listA.

Cross

It will return −1 even when x is present in listA.



Question 7-Explanation: 

The function is iterative implementation of Binary Search.  k keeps track of current middle element. i and j keep track of left and right corners of current subarray

Hence Option(B) is the correct answer.

Question 8

The increasing order of performance  of the searching algorithms are:

Tick

linear search  <  jump search  <  binary search

Cross

linear search  >  jump search  <  binary search

Cross

linear search  <  jump search  >  binary search

Cross

linear search  >  jump search  >  binary search



Question 8-Explanation: 

Like Binary Search, Jump Search is a searching algorithm for sorted arrays. The basic idea is to check fewer elements (than linear search) by jumping ahead by fixed steps or skipping some elements in place of searching all elements.
For example, suppose we have an array arr[] of size n and a block (to be jumped) of size m. Then we search in the indexes arr[0], arr[m], arr[2m]…..arr[km], and so on. Once we find the interval (arr[km] < x < arr[(k+1)m]), we perform a linear search operation from the index km to find the element x.

Performance in comparison to linear and binary search:

If we compare it with linear and binary search then it comes out then it is better than linear search but not better than binary search. The increasing order of performance is:

linear search  <  jump search  <  binary search

Hence Option(A) is the correct answer.

Question 9

The increasing order of performance  of the searching algorithms are:

Tick

linear search  <  jump search  <  binary search

Cross

linear search  >  jump search  <  binary search

Cross

linear search  <  jump search  >  binary search

Cross

linear search  >  jump search  >  binary search



Question 9-Explanation: 

Like Binary Search, Jump Search is a searching algorithm for sorted arrays. The basic idea is to check fewer elements (than linear search) by jumping ahead by fixed steps or skipping some elements in place of searching all elements.
For example, suppose we have an array arr[] of size n and a block (to be jumped) of size m. Then we search in the indexes arr[0], arr[m], arr[2m]…..arr[km], and so on. Once we find the interval (arr[km] < x < arr[(k+1)m]), we perform a linear search operation from the index km to find the element x.

Performance in comparison to linear and binary search:

If we compare it with linear and binary search then it comes out then it is better than linear search but not better than binary search. The increasing order of performance is:

linear search  <  jump search  <  binary search

Hence Option(A) is the correct answer.

Question 10

The average number of key comparisons done in a successful sequential search in a list of length n is

Cross

log n

Cross

(n-1)/2

Cross

n/2

Tick

(n+1)/2



Question 10-Explanation: 

If element is at 1 position then it requires 1 comparison. If element is at 2 position then it requires 2 comparison. If element is at 3 position then it requires 3 comparisons. Similarly, If element is at n position then it requires n comparison.

Total comparison = n(n+1)/2
For average comparison = (n(n+1)/2) / n = (n+1)/2 

Option (D) is correct.

There are 30 questions to complete.


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