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Type System Unification in C# .NET
  • Difficulty Level : Medium
  • Last Updated : 06 May, 2019

The Type System Unification in C# means all the data types in C# are inherited from the Object class, whether directly or indirectly. Or you can say all types are considered as objects. In C#, primitive types are known as the Value Types which are basically structs. Internally, structs and classes inherit the Object Class. That’s why all types are indirectly considered as Objects, and this terminology is known as Type System Unification.

Example: All the predefined types (like short, int long etc.) are structs. Below are predefined types along with their struct equivalents:

Predefined TypeEquivalent Struct
shortSystem.Int16
intSystem.Int32
longSystem.Int64
ushortSystem.UInt16
uintSystem.UInt32
ulongSystem.Int64
byteSystem.Byte
sbyteSystem.SByte
boolSystem.Boolean
charSystem.Char
FloatSystem.Single
DoubleSystem.Double
DecimalSystem.Decimal

Example: In the below program, the value data types such as int, char, bool are used as objects because of type system unification with the method ToString() that returns a string representing that particular object.




// C# implementation of Type 
// System Unification
using System;
  
class GFG {
  
    // Main Method
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Value data types
        int i = 1;
        char c = 'A';
        bool b = true;
  
        Console.WriteLine(i.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine(c.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine(b.ToString());
    }
}
Output:
1
A
True

Boxing and Unboxing

Type System Unification enables boxing and unboxing as any value data type can be treated as an object. So, when a value data type such as int, char, bool, etc. is converted into an object type, it is known as boxing. Conversely, when the object type is converted back into the data type, it is known as unboxing.



Boxing: A value data type such as int, char, bool, etc. is converted into an object type implicitly in boxing. First, an object type is allocated and then the value in the value data type is copied into the object type.

Example:




// C# implementation of Boxing
using System;
  
class GFG {
  
    // Main Method
    static public void Main()
    {
        // int value data type
        int val = 8;
  
        // boxing
        object obj = val;
  
        System.Console.WriteLine("val = {0}", val);
        System.Console.WriteLine("obj = {0}", obj);
    }
}
Output:
val = 8
obj = 8

Unboxing: An object type is converted into a value data type such as int, char, bool, etc. explicitly in unboxing. First, it is checked if the object type is the boxed value of the value data type. If yes, then the value in the object type is copied out of it.

Example:




// C# implementation of Unboxing
using System;
  
class GFG {
  
    // Main Method
    static public void Main()
    {
        // int value data type
        int val1 = 8;
  
        // boxing
        object obj = val1;
  
        // unboxing
        int val2 = (int)obj;
  
        Console.WriteLine("val1 = " + val1);
        Console.WriteLine("obj = " + obj);
        Console.WriteLine("val2 = " + val2);
    }
}
Output:
val1 = 8
obj = 8
val2 = 8

Benefits of Type System Unification: The Type System Unification is quite useful as it provides the dual benefit of a data type behaving as a value data type or an object type. A value data type can be used when required and it can be converted into an object type using boxing if required because of the inherent characteristic of Type System Unification.




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