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Python calendar module : yeardatescalendar() method

  • Last Updated : 14 May, 2021
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Calendar module allows to output calendars like program, and provides additional useful functions related to the calendar. Functions and classes defined in Calendar module use an idealized calendar, the current Gregorian calendar extended indefinitely in both directions. 
yeardatescalendar() method in Python is used to get a list of the weeks in the month of the year as full weeks. Entries in the week lists are day numbers. Day numbers outside this month are zero.
 

Syntax: yeardatescalendar(year, width)

Parameter: 
year: year of the calendar
width: [Default: 3] number of months in each row. 

Returns: a list of month rows.

Code #1: 
 

Python3




# Python program to demonstrate working
# of yeardatescalendar() method
 
# importing calendar module
import calendar
 
obj = calendar.Calendar()
 
year = 2016
# default value of width is 3
 
# printing with yeardatescalendar
print(obj.yeardatescalendar(year))

Output: 
 

[[[[datetime.date(2018, 1, 1), datetime.date(2018, 1, 2), datetime.date(2018, 1, 3), datetime.date(2018, 1, 4), datetime.date(2018, 1, 5), datetime.date(2018, 1, 6), datetime.date(2018, 1, 7)], [datetime.date(2018, 1, 8), datetime.date(2018, 1, 9), datetime.date(2018, 1, 10), datetime.date(2018, 1, 11), datetime.date(2018, 1, 12), datetime.date(2018, 1, 13), datetime.date(2018, 1, 14)], [datetime.date(2018, 1, 15), datetime.date(2018, 1, 16), datetime.date(2018, 1, 17), datetime.date(2018, 1, 18), datetime.date(2018, 1, 19), datetime.date(2018, 1, 20), datetime.date(2018, 1, 21)], [datetime.date(2018, 1, 22), datetime.date(2018, 1, 23), datetime.date(2018, 1, 24), datetime.date(2018, 1, 25), datetime.date(2018, 1, 26), datetime.date(2018, 1, 27), datetime.date(2018, 1, 28)], 
. . . . . 
[datetime.date(2018, 12, 17), datetime.date(2018, 12, 18), datetime.date(2018, 12, 19), datetime.date(2018, 12, 20), datetime.date(2018, 12, 21), datetime.date(2018, 12, 22), datetime.date(2018, 12, 23)], [datetime.date(2018, 12, 24), datetime.date(2018, 12, 25), datetime.date(2018, 12, 26), datetime.date(2018, 12, 27), datetime.date(2018, 12, 28), datetime.date(2018, 12, 29), datetime.date(2018, 12, 30)], [datetime.date(2018, 12, 31), datetime.date(2019, 1, 1), datetime.date(2019, 1, 2), datetime.date(2019, 1, 3), datetime.date(2019, 1, 4), datetime.date(2019, 1, 5), datetime.date(2019, 1, 6)]]]]



 
Note that weeks in the output are lists of seven datetime.date objects. 
  
Code #2: iterating the list of weeks 
 

Python3




# Python program to demonstrate working
# of yeardatescalendar() method
 
# importing calendar module
import calendar
 
obj = calendar.Calendar()
 
# iterating with yeardatescalendar
for day in obj.yeardatescalendar(2018, 1):
    print(day)

Output: 
 

[[[datetime.date(2018, 1, 1), datetime.date(2018, 1, 2), datetime.date(2018, 1, 3), datetime.date(2018, 1, 4) . . . datetime.date(2018, 1, 31), datetime.date(2018, 2, 1), datetime.date(2018, 2, 2), datetime.date(2018, 2, 3), datetime.date(2018, 2, 4)]]] 
. . . . 
[[[datetime.date(2018, 11, 26), datetime.date(2018, 11, 27), datetime.date(2018, 11, 28), datetime.date(2018, 11, 29), datetime.date(2018, 11, 30), datetime.date(2018, 12, 1), datetime.date(2018, 12, 2)], [datetime.date(2018, 12, 3). . .datetime.date(2018, 12, 29), datetime.date(2018, 12, 30)], [datetime.date(2018, 12, 31), datetime.date(2019, 1, 1), datetime.date(2019, 1, 2), datetime.date(2019, 1, 3), datetime.date(2019, 1, 4), datetime.date(2019, 1, 5), datetime.date(2019, 1, 6)]]]

 

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