Polynomial Regression in R Programming

Polynomial Regression is a form of linear regression in which the relationship between the independent variable x and dependent variable y is modeled as an nth degree polynomial. Polynomial regression fits a nonlinear relationship between the value of x and the corresponding conditional mean of y, denoted E(y|x). Basically it adds the quadratic or polynomial terms to the regression. Generally, this kind of regression is used for one resultant variable and one predictor.

Need of Polynomial Regression

  • Unlike linear data set, if one tries to apply linear model on non-linear data set without any modification, then there will be a very unsatisfactory and drastic result .
  • This may lead to increase in loss function, decrease in accuracy and high error rate.
  • Unlike linear model, polynomial model covers more data points.

Applications of Polynomial Regression 

Generally, polynomial regression is used in the following scenarios :

  • Rate of growth of tissues.
  • Progression of the epidemics related to disease.
  • Distribution phenomenon of the isotopes of carbon in lake sediments.

Explanation of Polynomial Regression in R Programming

Polynomial Regression is also known as Polynomial Linear Regression since it depends on the linearly arranged coefficients rather than the variables. In R, if one wants to implement polynomial regression then he must install the following packages:

  • tidyverse package for better visualization and manipulation.
  • caret package for a smoother and easier machine learning workflow.

After proper installation of the packages, one needs to set the data properly. For that, first one needs to split the data into two sets(train set and test set). Then one can visualize the data into various plots. In R, in order to fit a polynomial regression, first one needs to generate pseudo random numbers using the set.seed(n) function. 

The polynomial regression adds polynomial or quadratic terms to the regression equation as follow:



medv = b0 + b1 * lstat + b2 * lstat 2

where

mdev: is the median house value

lstat: is the predictor variable

In R, to create a predictor x2 one should use the function I(), as follow: I(x2). This raise x to the power 2. The polynomial regression can be computed in R as follow:

lm(medv ~ lstat + I(lstat^2), data = train.data)

For this following example let’s take the Boston data set of MASS package.

Example:

filter_none

edit
close

play_arrow

link
brightness_4
code

# R program to illustrate
# Polynomial regression
  
# Imporing required library
library(tidyverse)
library(caret)
theme_set(theme_classic())
  
# Load the data
data("Boston", package = "MASS")
# Split the data into training and test set
set.seed(123)
training.samples <- Boston$medv %>%
  createDataPartition(p = 0.8, list = FALSE)
train.data  <- Boston[training.samples, ]
test.data <- Boston[-training.samples, ]
  
# Build the model
model <- lm(medv ~ poly(lstat, 5, raw = TRUE), 
            data = train.data)
# Make predictions
predictions <- model %>% predict(test.data)
# Model performance
modelPerfomance = data.frame(
                    RMSE = RMSE(predictions, test.data$medv),
                     R2 = R2(predictions, test.data$medv)
                 )
  
print(lm(medv ~ lstat + I(lstat^2), data = train.data))
print(modelPerfomance)

chevron_right


Output:

Call:
lm(formula = medv ~ lstat + I(lstat^2), data = train.data)

Coefficients:
(Intercept)        lstat     I(lstat^2)  
    42.5736       -2.2673       0.0412  

      RMSE        R2
1   5.270374 0.6829474

Graph plotting of Polynomial Regression

In R, if one wants to plot a graph for the output generated on implementing Polynomial Regression he can use the ggplot() function.

Example:

filter_none

edit
close

play_arrow

link
brightness_4
code

# R program to illustrate
# Graph plotting in
# Polynomial regression
  
# Importing required library
library(tidyverse)
library(caret)
theme_set(theme_classic())
  
# Load the data
data("Boston", package = "MASS")
# Split the data into training and test set
set.seed(123)
training.samples <- Boston$medv %>%
  createDataPartition(p = 0.8, list = FALSE)
train.data  <- Boston[training.samples, ]
test.data <- Boston[-training.samples, ]
  
# Build the model
model <- lm(medv ~ poly(lstat, 5, raw = TRUE), data = train.data)
# Make predictions
predictions <- model %>% predict(test.data)
# Model performance
data.frame(RMSE = RMSE(predictions, test.data$medv),
           R2 = R2(predictions, test.data$medv))
    
ggplot(train.data, aes(lstat, medv) ) + geom_point() + 
stat_smooth(method = lm, formula = y ~ poly(x, 5, raw = TRUE))

chevron_right


Output:

graph-output




My Personal Notes arrow_drop_up

Check out this Author's contributed articles.

If you like GeeksforGeeks and would like to contribute, you can also write an article using contribute.geeksforgeeks.org or mail your article to contribute@geeksforgeeks.org. See your article appearing on the GeeksforGeeks main page and help other Geeks.

Please Improve this article if you find anything incorrect by clicking on the "Improve Article" button below.


Article Tags :

Be the First to upvote.


Please write to us at contribute@geeksforgeeks.org to report any issue with the above content.