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Optimal Binary Search Tree | DP-24

  • Difficulty Level : Hard
  • Last Updated : 19 Aug, 2021

Given a sorted array key [0.. n-1] of search keys and an array freq[0.. n-1] of frequency counts, where freq[i] is the number of searches for keys[i]. Construct a binary search tree of all keys such that the total cost of all the searches is as small as possible.
Let us first define the cost of a BST. The cost of a BST node is the level of that node multiplied by its frequency. The level of the root is 1.

Examples:  

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Input:  keys[] = {10, 12}, freq[] = {34, 50}
There can be following two possible BSTs 
        10                       12
          \                     / 
           12                 10
          I                     II
Frequency of searches of 10 and 12 are 34 and 50 respectively.
The cost of tree I is 34*1 + 50*2 = 134
The cost of tree II is 50*1 + 34*2 = 118 


Input:  keys[] = {10, 12, 20}, freq[] = {34, 8, 50}
There can be following possible BSTs
    10                12                 20         10              20
      \             /    \              /             \            /
      12          10     20           12               20         10  
        \                            /                 /           \
         20                        10                12             12  
     I               II             III             IV             V
Among all possible BSTs, cost of the fifth BST is minimum.  
Cost of the fifth BST is 1*50 + 2*34 + 3*8 = 142 

1) Optimal Substructure: 
The optimal cost for freq[i..j] can be recursively calculated using the following formula. 
optcost\left ( i, \right j) = \sum_{k=i}^{j} freq \begin{bmatrix}k\end{bmatrix} + min_{r=i}^{j}\begin{bmatrix} optcost(i, r-1) + optcost(r+1, j) \end{bmatrix}
We need to calculate optCost(0, n-1) to find the result. 
The idea of above formula is simple, we one by one try all nodes as root (r varies from i to j in second term). When we make rth node as root, we recursively calculate optimal cost from i to r-1 and r+1 to j. 
We add sum of frequencies from i to j (see first term in the above formula)



The reason for adding the sum of frequencies from i to j:

This can be divided into 2 parts one is the freq[r]+sum of frequencies of all elements from i to j except r. The term freq[r] is added because it is going to be root and that means level of 1, so freq[r]*1=freq[r]. Now the actual part comes, we are adding the frequencies of remaining elements because as we take r as root then all the elements other than that are going 1 level down than that is calculated in the subproblem. Let me put it in a more clear way, for calculating optcost(i,j) we assume that the r is taken as root and calculate min of opt(i,r-1)+opt(r+1,j) for all i<=r<=j. Here for every subproblem we are  choosing one node as a root. But in reality the level of subproblem root and all its descendant nodes will be 1 greater than the level of the parent problem root. Therefore the frequency of all the nodes except r should be added which accounts to the descend in their level compared to level assumed in subproblem.
2) Overlapping Subproblems 
Following is recursive implementation that simply follows the recursive structure mentioned above. 
 

C++




// A naive recursive implementation of
// optimal binary search tree problem
#include <bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;
 
// A utility function to get sum of
// array elements freq[i] to freq[j]
int sum(int freq[], int i, int j);
 
// A recursive function to calculate
// cost of optimal binary search tree
int optCost(int freq[], int i, int j)
{
    // Base cases
    if (j < i)  // no elements in this subarray
        return 0;
    if (j == i) // one element in this subarray
        return freq[i];
     
    // Get sum of freq[i], freq[i+1], ... freq[j]
    int fsum = sum(freq, i, j);
     
    // Initialize minimum value
    int min = INT_MAX;
     
    // One by one consider all elements
    // as root and recursively find cost
    // of the BST, compare the cost with
    // min and update min if needed
    for (int r = i; r <= j; ++r)
    {
        int cost = optCost(freq, i, r - 1) +
                   optCost(freq, r + 1, j);
        if (cost < min)
            min = cost;
    }
     
    // Return minimum value
    return min + fsum;
}
 
// The main function that calculates
// minimum cost of a Binary Search Tree.
// It mainly uses optCost() to find
// the optimal cost.
int optimalSearchTree(int keys[],
                      int freq[], int n)
{
    // Here array keys[] is assumed to be
    // sorted in increasing order. If keys[]
    // is not sorted, then add code to sort
    // keys, and rearrange freq[] accordingly.
    return optCost(freq, 0, n - 1);
}
 
// A utility function to get sum of
// array elements freq[i] to freq[j]
int sum(int freq[], int i, int j)
{
    int s = 0;
    for (int k = i; k <= j; k++)
    s += freq[k];
    return s;
}
 
// Driver Code
int main()
{
    int keys[] = {10, 12, 20};
    int freq[] = {34, 8, 50};
    int n = sizeof(keys) / sizeof(keys[0]);
    cout << "Cost of Optimal BST is "
         << optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n);
    return 0;
}
 
// This is code is contributed
// by rathbhupendra

C




// A naive recursive implementation of optimal binary
// search tree problem
#include <stdio.h>
#include <limits.h>
 
// A utility function to get sum of array elements
// freq[i] to freq[j]
int sum(int freq[], int i, int j);
 
// A recursive function to calculate cost of optimal
// binary search tree
int optCost(int freq[], int i, int j)
{
   // Base cases
   if (j < i)      // no elements in this subarray
     return 0;
   if (j == i)     // one element in this subarray
     return freq[i];
 
   // Get sum of freq[i], freq[i+1], ... freq[j]
   int fsum = sum(freq, i, j);
 
   // Initialize minimum value
   int min = INT_MAX;
 
   // One by one consider all elements as root and
   // recursively find cost of the BST, compare the
   // cost with min and update min if needed
   for (int r = i; r <= j; ++r)
   {
       int cost = optCost(freq, i, r-1) +
                  optCost(freq, r+1, j);
       if (cost < min)
          min = cost;
   }
 
   // Return minimum value
   return min + fsum;
}
 
// The main function that calculates minimum cost of
// a Binary Search Tree. It mainly uses optCost() to
// find the optimal cost.
int optimalSearchTree(int keys[], int freq[], int n)
{
     // Here array keys[] is assumed to be sorted in
     // increasing order. If keys[] is not sorted, then
     // add code to sort keys, and rearrange freq[]
     // accordingly.
     return optCost(freq, 0, n-1);
}
 
// A utility function to get sum of array elements
// freq[i] to freq[j]
int sum(int freq[], int i, int j)
{
    int s = 0;
    for (int k = i; k <=j; k++)
       s += freq[k];
    return s;
}
 
// Driver program to test above functions
int main()
{
    int keys[] = {10, 12, 20};
    int freq[] = {34, 8, 50};
    int n = sizeof(keys)/sizeof(keys[0]);
    printf("Cost of Optimal BST is %d ",
               optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n));
    return 0;
}

Java




// A naive recursive implementation of optimal binary
// search tree problem
public class GFG
{
    // A recursive function to calculate cost of
        // optimal binary search tree
    static int optCost(int freq[], int i, int j)
    {
       // Base cases
       if (j < i)      // no elements in this subarray
         return 0;
       if (j == i)     // one element in this subarray
         return freq[i];
      
       // Get sum of freq[i], freq[i+1], ... freq[j]
       int fsum = sum(freq, i, j);
      
       // Initialize minimum value
       int min = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
      
       // One by one consider all elements as root and
           // recursively find cost of the BST, compare the
           // cost with min and update min if needed
       for (int r = i; r <= j; ++r)
       {
           int cost = optCost(freq, i, r-1) +
                          optCost(freq, r+1, j);
           if (cost < min)
              min = cost;
       }
      
       // Return minimum value
       return min + fsum;
    }
     
    // The main function that calculates minimum cost of
        // a Binary Search Tree. It mainly uses optCost() to
        // find the optimal cost.
    static int optimalSearchTree(int keys[], int freq[], int n)
    {
         // Here array keys[] is assumed to be sorted in
             // increasing order. If keys[] is not sorted, then
             // add code to sort keys, and rearrange freq[]
             // accordingly.
         return optCost(freq, 0, n-1);
    }
     
    // A utility function to get sum of array elements
        // freq[i] to freq[j]
    static int sum(int freq[], int i, int j)
    {
        int s = 0;
        for (int k = i; k <=j; k++)
           s += freq[k];
        return s;
    }
     
    // Driver code
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int keys[] = {10, 12, 20};
        int freq[] = {34, 8, 50};
        int n = keys.length;
        System.out.println("Cost of Optimal BST is " +
                         optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n));
    }
}
// This code is contributed by Sumit Ghosh

Python3




# A naive recursive implementation of
# optimal binary search tree problem
 
# A recursive function to calculate
# cost of optimal binary search tree
def optCost(freq, i, j):
     
    # Base cases
    if j < i:     # no elements in this subarray
        return 0
    if j == i:     # one element in this subarray
        return freq[i]
     
    # Get sum of freq[i], freq[i+1], ... freq[j]
    fsum = Sum(freq, i, j)
     
    # Initialize minimum value
    Min = 999999999999
     
    # One by one consider all elements as
    # root and recursively find cost of
    # the BST, compare the cost with min
    # and update min if needed
    for r in range(i, j + 1):
        cost = (optCost(freq, i, r - 1) +
                optCost(freq, r + 1, j))
        if cost < Min:
            Min = cost
     
    # Return minimum value
    return Min + fsum
 
# The main function that calculates minimum
# cost of a Binary Search Tree. It mainly
# uses optCost() to find the optimal cost.
def optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n):
     
    # Here array keys[] is assumed to be
    # sorted in increasing order. If keys[]
    # is not sorted, then add code to sort 
    # keys, and rearrange freq[] accordingly.
    return optCost(freq, 0, n - 1)
 
# A utility function to get sum of
# array elements freq[i] to freq[j]
def Sum(freq, i, j):
    s = 0
    for k in range(i, j + 1):
        s += freq[k]
    return s
 
# Driver Code
if __name__ == '__main__':
    keys = [10, 12, 20]
    freq = [34, 8, 50]
    n = len(keys)
    print("Cost of Optimal BST is",
           optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n))
     
# This code is contributed by PranchalK

C#




// A naive recursive implementation of optimal binary
// search tree problem
using System;
 
class GFG
{
    // A recursive function to calculate cost of
    // optimal binary search tree
    static int optCost(int []freq, int i, int j)
    {
         
    // Base cases
    // no elements in this subarray
    if (j < i)    
        return 0;
     
    // one element in this subarray   
    if (j == i)    
        return freq[i];
     
    // Get sum of freq[i], freq[i+1], ... freq[j]
    int fsum = sum(freq, i, j);
     
    // Initialize minimum value
    int min = int.MaxValue;
     
    // One by one consider all elements as root and
    // recursively find cost of the BST, compare the
    // cost with min and update min if needed
    for (int r = i; r <= j; ++r)
    {
        int cost = optCost(freq, i, r-1) +
                        optCost(freq, r+1, j);
        if (cost < min)
            min = cost;
    }
     
    // Return minimum value
    return min + fsum;
    }
     
    // The main function that calculates minimum cost of
    // a Binary Search Tree. It mainly uses optCost() to
    // find the optimal cost.
    static int optimalSearchTree(int []keys, int []freq, int n)
    {
        // Here array keys[] is assumed to be sorted in
        // increasing order. If keys[] is not sorted, then
        // add code to sort keys, and rearrange freq[]
        // accordingly.
        return optCost(freq, 0, n-1);
    }
     
    // A utility function to get sum of array elements
    // freq[i] to freq[j]
    static int sum(int []freq, int i, int j)
    {
        int s = 0;
        for (int k = i; k <=j; k++)
        s += freq[k];
        return s;
    }
     
    // Driver code
    public static void Main()
    {
        int []keys = {10, 12, 20};
        int []freq = {34, 8, 50};
        int n = keys.Length;
        Console.Write("Cost of Optimal BST is " +
                        optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n));
    }
}
 
// This code is contributed by Sam007

Javascript




<script>
//Javascript Implementation
  
// A recursive function to calculate
// cost of optimal binary search tree
function optCost(freq, i, j)
{
    // Base cases
    if (j < i)  // no elements in this subarray
        return 0;
    if (j == i) // one element in this subarray
        return freq[i];
      
    // Get sum of freq[i], freq[i+1], ... freq[j]
    var fsum = sum(freq, i, j);
      
    // Initialize minimum value
    var min = Number. MAX_SAFE_INTEGER;
      
    // One by one consider all elements
    // as root and recursively find cost
    // of the BST, compare the cost with
    // min and update min if needed
    for (var r = i; r <= j; ++r)
    {
        var cost = optCost(freq, i, r - 1) +
                   optCost(freq, r + 1, j);
        if (cost < min)
            min = cost;
    }
      
    // Return minimum value
    return min + fsum;
}
  
// The main function that calculates
// minimum cost of a Binary Search Tree.
// It mainly uses optCost() to find
// the optimal cost.
function optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n)
{
    // Here array keys[] is assumed to be
    // sorted in increasing order. If keys[]
    // is not sorted, then add code to sort
    // keys, and rearrange freq[] accordingly.
    return optCost(freq, 0, n - 1);
}
  
// A utility function to get sum of
// array elements freq[i] to freq[j]
function sum(freq, i, j)
{
    var s = 0;
    for (var k = i; k <= j; k++)
    s += freq[k];
    return s;
}
  
 
// Driver Code
 
var keys = [10, 12, 20];
var freq = [34, 8, 50];
var n = keys.length;
document.write("Cost of Optimal BST is " +
    optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n));
     
// This code is contributed by shubhamsingh10
</script>

Output: 

Cost of Optimal BST is 142

Time complexity of the above naive recursive approach is exponential. It should be noted that the above function computes the same subproblems again and again. We can see many subproblems being repeated in the following recursion tree for freq[1..4]. 
 

Since same subproblems are called again, this problem has Overlapping Subproblems property. So optimal BST problem has both properties (see this and this) of a dynamic programming problem. Like other typical Dynamic Programming(DP) problems, recomputations of same subproblems can be avoided by constructing a temporary array cost[][] in bottom up manner.
Dynamic Programming Solution 
Following is C/C++ implementation for optimal BST problem using Dynamic Programming. We use an auxiliary array cost[n][n] to store the solutions of subproblems. cost[0][n-1] will hold the final result. The challenge in implementation is, all diagonal values must be filled first, then the values which lie on the line just above the diagonal. In other words, we must first fill all cost[i][i] values, then all cost[i][i+1] values, then all cost[i][i+2] values. So how to fill the 2D array in such manner> The idea used in the implementation is same as Matrix Chain Multiplication problem, we use a variable ‘L’ for chain length and increment ‘L’, one by one. We calculate column number ‘j’ using the values of ‘i’ and ‘L’. 
 

C++




// Dynamic Programming code for Optimal Binary Search
// Tree Problem
#include <bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;
 
// A utility function to get sum of array elements
// freq[i] to freq[j]
int sum(int freq[], int i, int j);
 
/* A Dynamic Programming based function that calculates
minimum cost of a Binary Search Tree. */
int optimalSearchTree(int keys[], int freq[], int n)
{
    /* Create an auxiliary 2D matrix to store results
    of subproblems */
    int cost[n][n];
 
    /* cost[i][j] = Optimal cost of binary search tree
    that can be formed from keys[i] to keys[j].
    cost[0][n-1] will store the resultant cost */
 
    // For a single key, cost is equal to frequency of the key
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        cost[i][i] = freq[i];
 
    // Now we need to consider chains of length 2, 3, ... .
    // L is chain length.
    for (int L = 2; L <= n; L++)
    {
        // i is row number in cost[][]
        for (int i = 0; i <= n-L+1; i++)
        {
            // Get column number j from row number i and
            // chain length L
            int j = i+L-1;
            cost[i][j] = INT_MAX;
 
            // Try making all keys in interval keys[i..j] as root
            for (int r = i; r <= j; r++)
            {
            // c = cost when keys[r] becomes root of this subtree
            int c = ((r > i)? cost[i][r-1]:0) +
                    ((r < j)? cost[r+1][j]:0) +
                    sum(freq, i, j);
            if (c < cost[i][j])
                cost[i][j] = c;
            }
        }
    }
    return cost[0][n-1];
}
 
// A utility function to get sum of array elements
// freq[i] to freq[j]
int sum(int freq[], int i, int j)
{
    int s = 0;
    for (int k = i; k <= j; k++)
    s += freq[k];
    return s;
}
 
// Driver code
int main()
{
    int keys[] = {10, 12, 20};
    int freq[] = {34, 8, 50};
    int n = sizeof(keys)/sizeof(keys[0]);
    cout << "Cost of Optimal BST is " << optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n);
    return 0;
}
 
// This code is contributed by rathbhupendra

C




// Dynamic Programming code for Optimal Binary Search
// Tree Problem
#include <stdio.h>
#include <limits.h>
 
// A utility function to get sum of array elements
// freq[i] to freq[j]
int sum(int freq[], int i, int j);
 
/* A Dynamic Programming based function that calculates
  minimum cost of a Binary Search Tree. */
int optimalSearchTree(int keys[], int freq[], int n)
{
    /* Create an auxiliary 2D matrix to store results
      of subproblems */
    int cost[n][n];
 
    /* cost[i][j] = Optimal cost of binary search tree
       that can be  formed from keys[i] to keys[j].
       cost[0][n-1] will store the resultant cost */
 
    // For a single key, cost is equal to frequency of the key
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        cost[i][i] = freq[i];
 
    // Now we need to consider chains of length 2, 3, ... .
    // L is chain length.
    for (int L=2; L<=n; L++)
    {
        // i is row number in cost[][]
        for (int i=0; i<=n-L+1; i++)
        {
            // Get column number j from row number i and
            // chain length L
            int j = i+L-1;
            cost[i][j] = INT_MAX;
 
            // Try making all keys in interval keys[i..j] as root
            for (int r=i; r<=j; r++)
            {
               // c = cost when keys[r] becomes root of this subtree
               int c = ((r > i)? cost[i][r-1]:0) +
                       ((r < j)? cost[r+1][j]:0) +
                       sum(freq, i, j);
               if (c < cost[i][j])
                  cost[i][j] = c;
            }
        }
    }
    return cost[0][n-1];
}
 
// A utility function to get sum of array elements
// freq[i] to freq[j]
int sum(int freq[], int i, int j)
{
    int s = 0;
    for (int k = i; k <=j; k++)
       s += freq[k];
    return s;
}
 
// Driver program to test above functions
int main()
{
    int keys[] = {10, 12, 20};
    int freq[] = {34, 8, 50};
    int n = sizeof(keys)/sizeof(keys[0]);
    printf("Cost of Optimal BST is %d ",
                 optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n));
    return 0;
}

Java




// Dynamic Programming Java code for Optimal Binary Search
// Tree Problem
public class Optimal_BST2 {
     
    /* A Dynamic Programming based function that calculates
        minimum cost of a Binary Search Tree.  */
    static int optimalSearchTree(int keys[], int freq[], int n) {
 
        /* Create an auxiliary 2D matrix to store results of
           subproblems */
        int cost[][] = new int[n + 1][n + 1];
 
        /* cost[i][j] = Optimal cost of binary search tree that
           can be formed from keys[i] to keys[j]. cost[0][n-1]
           will store the resultant cost */
 
        // For a single key, cost is equal to frequency of the key
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            cost[i][i] = freq[i];
 
        // Now we need to consider chains of length 2, 3, ... .
        // L is chain length.
        for (int L = 2; L <= n; L++) {
 
            // i is row number in cost[][]
            for (int i = 0; i <= n - L + 1; i++) {
 
                // Get column number j from row number i and
                // chain length L
                int j = i + L - 1;
                cost[i][j] = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
 
                // Try making all keys in interval keys[i..j] as root
                for (int r = i; r <= j; r++) {
 
                    // c = cost when keys[r] becomes root of this subtree
                    int c = ((r > i) ? cost[i][r - 1] : 0)
                            + ((r < j) ? cost[r + 1][j] : 0) + sum(freq, i, j);
                    if (c < cost[i][j])
                        cost[i][j] = c;
                }
            }
        }
        return cost[0][n - 1];
    }
 
    // A utility function to get sum of array elements
    // freq[i] to freq[j]
    static int sum(int freq[], int i, int j) {
        int s = 0;
        for (int k = i; k <= j; k++) {
            if (k >= freq.length)
                continue;
            s += freq[k];
        }
        return s;
    }
 
    public static void main(String[] args) {
         
        int keys[] = { 10, 12, 20 };
        int freq[] = { 34, 8, 50 };
        int n = keys.length;
        System.out.println("Cost of Optimal BST is "
                + optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n));
    }
 
}
//This code is contributed by Sumit Ghosh

Python3




# Dynamic Programming code for Optimal Binary Search
# Tree Problem
 
INT_MAX = 2147483647
 
""" A Dynamic Programming based function that
calculates minimum cost of a Binary Search Tree. """
def optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n):
 
    """ Create an auxiliary 2D matrix to store
        results of subproblems """
    cost = [[0 for x in range(n)]
               for y in range(n)]
 
    """ cost[i][j] = Optimal cost of binary search
    tree that can be formed from keys[i] to keys[j].
    cost[0][n-1] will store the resultant cost """
 
    # For a single key, cost is equal to
    # frequency of the key
    for i in range(n):
        cost[i][i] = freq[i]
 
    # Now we need to consider chains of
    # length 2, 3, ... . L is chain length.
    for L in range(2, n + 1):
     
        # i is row number in cost
        for i in range(n - L + 2):
             
            # Get column number j from row number
            # i and chain length L
            j = i + L - 1
            if i >= n or j >= n:
                break
            cost[i][j] = INT_MAX
             
            # Try making all keys in interval
            # keys[i..j] as root
            for r in range(i, j + 1):
                 
                # c = cost when keys[r] becomes root
                # of this subtree
                c = 0
                if (r > i):
                    c += cost[i][r - 1]
                if (r < j):
                    c += cost[r + 1][j]
                c += sum(freq, i, j)
                if (c < cost[i][j]):
                    cost[i][j] = c
    return cost[0][n - 1]
 
 
# A utility function to get sum of
# array elements freq[i] to freq[j]
def sum(freq, i, j):
 
    s = 0
    for k in range(i, j + 1):
        s += freq[k]
    return s
     
# Driver Code
if __name__ == '__main__':
    keys = [10, 12, 20]
    freq = [34, 8, 50]
    n = len(keys)
    print("Cost of Optimal BST is",
           optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n))
     
# This code is contributed by SHUBHAMSINGH10

C#




// Dynamic Programming C# code for Optimal Binary Search
// Tree Problem
using System;
 
class GFG
{
    /* A Dynamic Programming based function that calculates
    minimum cost of a Binary Search Tree. */
    static int optimalSearchTree(int []keys, int []freq, int n) {
 
        /* Create an auxiliary 2D matrix to store results of
        subproblems */
        int [,]cost = new int[n + 1,n + 1];
 
        /* cost[i][j] = Optimal cost of binary search tree that
        can be formed from keys[i] to keys[j]. cost[0][n-1]
        will store the resultant cost */
 
        // For a single key, cost is equal to frequency of the key
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            cost[i,i] = freq[i];
 
        // Now we need to consider chains of length 2, 3, ... .
        // L is chain length.
        for (int L = 2; L <= n; L++) {
 
            // i is row number in cost[][]
            for (int i = 0; i <= n - L + 1; i++) {
 
                // Get column number j from row number i and
                // chain length L
                int j = i + L - 1;
                cost[i,j] = int.MaxValue;
 
                // Try making all keys in interval keys[i..j] as root
                for (int r = i; r <= j; r++) {
 
                    // c = cost when keys[r] becomes root of this subtree
                    int c = ((r > i) ? cost[i,r - 1] : 0)
                            + ((r < j) ? cost[r + 1,j] : 0) + sum(freq, i, j);
                    if (c < cost[i,j])
                        cost[i,j] = c;
                }
            }
        }
        return cost[0,n - 1];
    }
 
    // A utility function to get sum of array elements
    // freq[i] to freq[j]
    static int sum(int []freq, int i, int j) {
        int s = 0;
        for (int k = i; k <= j; k++) {
            if (k >= freq.Length)
                continue;
            s += freq[k];
        }
        return s;
    }
 
    public static void Main() {
         
        int []keys = { 10, 12, 20 };
        int []freq = { 34, 8, 50 };
        int n = keys.Length;
        Console.Write("Cost of Optimal BST is "
                + optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n));
    }
}
// This code is contributed by Sam007

Javascript




<script>
// Dynamic Programming code for Optimal Binary Search
// Tree Problem
 
/* A Dynamic Programming based function that calculates
minimum cost of a Binary Search Tree. */
function optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n)
{
    /* Create an auxiliary 2D matrix to store results
    of subproblems */
    var cost = new Array(n);
    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++)
        cost[i] = new Array(n);
  
    /* cost[i][j] = Optimal cost of binary search tree
    that can be formed from keys[i] to keys[j].
    cost[0][n-1] will store the resultant cost */
  
    // For a single key, cost is equal to frequency of the key
    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++)
        cost[i][i] = freq[i];
  
    // Now we need to consider chains of length 2, 3, ... .
    // L is chain length.
    for (var L = 2; L <= n; L++)
    {
        // i is row number in cost[][]
        for (var i = 0; i <= n-L+1; i++)
        {
            // Get column number j from row number i and
            // chain length L
            var j = i+L-1;
            if ( i >= n || j >= n)
                break
            cost[i][j] = Number. MAX_SAFE_INTEGER;
  
            // Try making all keys in interval keys[i..j] as root
            for (var r = i; r <= j; r++)
            {
            // c = cost when keys[r] becomes root of this subtree
            var c = 0;
            if (r > i)
                c += cost[i][r-1]
            if (r < j)
                c += cost[r+1][j]
            c += sum(freq, i, j);
            if (c < cost[i][j])
                cost[i][j] = c;
            }
        }
    }
    return cost[0][n-1];
}
  
// A utility function to get sum of array elements
// freq[i] to freq[j]
function sum(freq, i, j)
{
    var s = 0;
    for (var k = i; k <= j; k++)
        s += freq[k];
    return s;
}
var keys = [10, 12, 20];
var freq = [34, 8, 50];
var n = keys.length;
document.write("Cost of Optimal BST is " +
    optimalSearchTree(keys, freq, n));
  
// This code contributed by shubhamsingh10
</script>

Output: 
 

Cost of Optimal BST is 142

Notes 
1) The time complexity of the above solution is O(n^4). The time complexity can be easily reduced to O(n^3) by pre-calculating sum of frequencies instead of calling sum() again and again.
2) In the above solutions, we have computed optimal cost only. The solutions can be easily modified to store the structure of BSTs also. We can create another auxiliary array of size n to store the structure of tree. All we need to do is, store the chosen ‘r’ in the innermost loop.
Please write comments if you find anything incorrect, or you want to share more information about the topic discussed above.
 




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