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How to Print Multiple Arguments in Python?

  • Difficulty Level : Medium
  • Last Updated : 29 Dec, 2020

An argument is a value that is passed within a function when it is called.They are independent items, or variables, that contain data or codes. During the time of call each argument is always assigned to the parameter in the function definition.

Example: Simple argument

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Python3




def GFG(name, num):
    print("Hello from ", name + ', ' + num)
  
  
GFG("geeks for geeks", "25")

Output:



Hello from  geeks for geeks, 25

Calling the above code with no arguments or just one argument generates an error.

Variable Function Arguments

As shown above, functions had a fixed number of arguments. In Python, there are other ways to define a function that can take the variable number of arguments.
Different forms are discussed below:

  • Python Default Arguments: Function arguments can have default values in Python. We provide a default value to an argument by using the assignment operator (=).

Example:

Python3




def GFG(name, num="25"):
    print("Hello from", name + ', ' + num)
  
  
GFG("gfg")
GFG("gfg", "26")

Output:

Hello from gfg, 25

Hello from gfg, 26

  • Pass it as a tuple
     

Python3




def GFG(name, num):
    print("hello from %s , %s" % (name, num))
  
  
GFG("gfg", "25")

Output:



hello from gfg , 25

  • Pass it as a dictionary
     

Python3




def GFG(name, num):
    print("hello from %(n)s , %(s)s" % {'n': name, 's': num})
  
  
GFG("gfg", "25")

Output:

hello from gfg , 25

  • Using new-style string formatting with number
     

Python3




def GFG(name, num):
    print("hello from {0} , {1}".format(name, num))
  
  
GFG("gfg", "25")

Output:

hello from gfg , 25

  • Using new-style string formatting with explicit names
     

Python3




def GFG(name, num):
    print("hello from {n} , {r}".format(n=name, r=num))
  
  
GFG("gfg", "25")

Output:

hello from gfg , 25

  • Concatenate strings
     

Python3




def GFG(name, num):
    print("hello from " + str(name) + " , " + str(num))
  
  
GFG("gfg", "25")

Output:

hello from gfg , 25

  •  Using the new f-string formatting in Python 3.6
     

Python3




def GFG(name, num):
    print(f'hello from {name} , {num}')
  
  
GFG("gfg", "25")

Output:



hello from gfg , 25

  • Using *args 

Python3




def GFG(*args):
    for info in args:
        print(info)
  
  
GFG(["Hello from", "geeks", 25], ["Hello", "gfg", 26])

Output:

[‘Hello from’, ‘geeks’, 25]

[‘Hello’, ‘gfg’, 26]

  • Using **kwargs 

Python3




def GFG(**kwargs):
    for key, value in kwargs.items():
        print(key, value)
  
  
GFG(name="geeks", n="- 25")
GFG(name="best", n="- 26")

Output:

name geeks

n – 25

name best

n – 26




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