fmt.Sscan() Function in Golang With Examples

In Go language, fmt package implements formatted I/O with functions analogous to C’s printf() and scanf() function. The fmt.Sscan() function in Go language scans the specified texts and store the successive space-separated texts into successive arguments. Moreover, this function is defined under the fmt package. Here, you need to import the “fmt” package in order to use these functions.

Syntax:

func Sscan(str string, a ...interface{}) (n int, err error)

Parameters: This function accepts two parameters which are illustrated below:

  • str string: This parameter contains the specified text which is going to be scanned.
  • a …interface{}: This parameter receives each texts.

Returns: It returns the number of items successfully scanned.

Example 1:



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// Golang program to illustrate the usage of
// fmt.Sscan() function
  
// Including the main package
package main
  
// Importing fmt
import (
    "fmt"
)
  
// Calling main
func main() {
  
    // Declaring two variables
    var name string
    var alphabet_count int
  
    // Calling the Sscan() function which
    // returns the number of elements
    // successfully scanned and error if
    // it persists
    n, err := fmt.Sscan("GFG 3", &name, &alphabet_count)
  
    // Below statements get executed if there is any error
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
  
    // Printing the number of elements and each elements also
    fmt.Printf("%d: %s, %d\n", n, name, alphabet_count)
  
}

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Output:

2: GFG, 3

Example 2:

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// Golang program to illustrate the usage of
// fmt.Sscan() function
  
// Including the main package
package main
  
// Importing fmt
import (
    "fmt"
)
  
// Calling main
func main() {
  
    // Declaring some variables
    var name string
    var alphabet_count int
    var float_value float32
    var boolean_value bool
  
    // Calling the Sscan() function which
    // returns the number of elements
    // successfully scanned and error if
    // it persists
    n, err := fmt.Sscan("GeeksforGeeks 13 6.7 true"
     &name, &alphabet_count, &float_value, &boolean_value)
  
    // Below statements get
    // executed if there is any error
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
  
    // Printing the number of 
    // elements and each elements also
    fmt.Printf("%d: %s, %d, %g, %t", n, name, 
     alphabet_count, float_value, boolean_value)
  
}

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Output:

4: GeeksforGeeks, 13, 6.7, true



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