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Float equals() method in Java with examples
  • Last Updated : 26 Oct, 2018

The equals() method in Float Class is a built-in function in java that compares this object to the specified object. The result is true if and only if the argument is not null and is a Float object that contains the same double value as this object. It returns false if both the objects are not same.

Syntax:

public boolean equals(Object obj)

Parameter: The method accepts only one parameter obj which specifies the passed object is the object that is to be compared with.

Return Values: The function returns a boolean value after comparing with the object passed in the parameter:

  • It returns true if and only if the argument is not null and is a Float object that contains the same double value as this object. It returns false if the object is not same.
  • If f1 and f2 both is represented as Float.NaN, then the equals() method returns true, even if Float.NaN==Float.NaN has the value false.
  • If f1 represents +0.0f while f2 represents -0.0f, or vice versa, the equal test has the value false, even though 0.0f==-0.0f has the value true.

Below programs illustrates the use of Float.equals() method:



Program 1:




// Java program to demonstrate
// Float.equals() method
  
import java.lang.*;
  
class Gfg1 {
  
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
  
        // When two objects are different
        Float obj1 = new Float(123123);
        Float obj2 = new Float(164165);
  
        System.out.print("The objects " + obj1
                         + " and " + obj2
                         + "are : ");
        if (obj1.equals(obj2))
            System.out.println("Equal");
        else
            System.out.println("Not equal");
  
        // When two objects are equal
        obj1 = new Float(12345);
        obj2 = new Float(12345);
        System.out.print("The objects " + obj1
                         + " and " + obj2
                         + "are : ");
        if (obj1.equals(obj2))
            System.out.print("Equal");
        else
            System.out.print("Not Equal");
    }
}


Output:

The objects 123123.0 and 164165.0are : Not equal
The objects 12345.0 and 12345.0are : Equal

Program 2: Using Float.NaN




// Java program to demonstrate
// Float.equals() method
  
import java.lang.*;
  
class Gfg1 {
  
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
  
        Float obj1 = new Float(Float.NaN);
        Float obj2 = new Float(Float.NaN);
  
        System.out.print("The objects " + obj1
                         + " and " + obj2
                         + "are : ");
        if (obj1.equals(obj2))
            System.out.println("Equal");
        else
            System.out.println("Not equal");
    }
}


Output:

The objects NaN and NaNare : Equal

Program 3: Using float value 0.0f




// Java program to demonstrate
// Float.equals() method
  
import java.lang.*;
  
class Gfg1 {
  
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
  
        Float obj1 = new Float(0.0f);
        Float obj2 = new Float(-0.0f);
  
        System.out.print("The objects " + obj1
                         + " and " + obj2
                         + "are : ");
        if (obj1.equals(obj2))
            System.out.println("Equal");
        else
            System.out.println("Not equal");
    }
}


Output:

The objects 0.0 and -0.0are : Not equal

Reference: https://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/Float.html#equals(java.lang.Object)

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