Open In App
Related Articles

Difference between Subnetting and Supernetting

Improve
Improve
Improve
Like Article
Like
Save Article
Save
Report issue
Report

Subnetting is the procedure to divide the network into sub-networks or small networks, these smaller networks are known as subnets. The subnet is also defined as an internal address made up of a combination of a small network and host segments. In a subnet, a few bits from the host portion are used to design small-sized subnetworks from the original network. In subnetting, network bits are converted into host bits. 

Supernetting is the procedure to combine small networks into larger spaces. In subnetting, Network addresses’ bits are increased. on the other hand, in supernetting, Host addresses’ bits are increased. Subnetting is implemented via Variable-length subnet masking, While super netting is implemented via Classless interdomain routing.

Subnetting and Supernetting

Subnetting and Supernetting


Difference between Subnetting and Supernetting

Subnetting

Supernetting

Subnetting is the procedure to divide the network into sub-networks.While supernetting is the procedure of combining small networks.
In subnetting, Network addresses’ bits are increased.While in supernetting, Host addresses’ bits are increased.
In subnetting, The mask bits are moved towards the right.While In supernetting, The mask bits are moved towards the left.
Subnetting is implemented via Variable-length subnet masking.While supernetting is implemented via Classless interdomain routing.
In subnetting, Address depletion is reduced or removed.While It is used for simplifying the routing process.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Subnetting and Supernetting

Subnetting

Advantages of subnetting

  1. Effective IP address use: Subnetting enables the division of a large network into smaller subnets, which aids in the efficient use of IP address allocation. It lessens IP address wastage and enables organizations to allocate IP addresses in accordance with their unique requirements.
  2. Subnetting can help reduce network congestion and enhance overall network performance by breaking up a large network into smaller subnets. Smaller subnets improve the efficiency of routing and switching operations and allow for better network traffic control.
  3. Increased network security: Subnetting makes it possible to implement security measures more precisely. Organizations can improve security by controlling access between subnets and implementing firewall rules by isolating various subnets from one another.

Disadvantages of subnetting

  1. Complexity: Subnetting can make network configuration and design more complicated. It can be difficult, especially for large networks, to choose the right subnet sizes, plan IP address ranges, and manage routing between subnets.
  2. Subnetting requires more administrative work, especially when adding new subnets or changing the configuration of existing ones. In addition to maintaining routing tables and ensuring proper connectivity between subnets, it entails managing IP address ranges.

Supernetting

Advantages of supernetting

  1. Supernetting enables the consolidation of several smaller networks into a single, larger network block, which reduces the size of the routing table and maximizes the use of IP address space.
  2. Routing can be made easier by combining several smaller networks into a supernet because fewer routing updates and table entries are required. This may result in increased routing effectiveness and decreased router overhead.
  3. A reduced number of routing lookups needed for packet forwarding thanks to supernetting can help improve network performance. As a result, packet processing may be accelerated and latency may be decreased.

Disadvantages of supernetting

  1. Loss of network granularity: Supernetting involves aggregating multiple networks into larger network blocks. This can result in a loss of granularity, making it more challenging to implement fine-grained network management, security policies, and traffic control.
  2. Increased risk of network failures: If a single supernet experiences a network failure, it can affect multiple smaller networks within that supernet. This makes troubleshooting and isolating network issues more complex.
  3. Limited flexibility: Supernetting requires careful planning and coordination to ensure that the aggregated networks have compatible address ranges. It may limit the ability to make independent changes to individual subnets within a supernet without affecting the entire supernet.

Conclusion

The terms “subnetting” and “supernetting,” which are used to divide a larger network into smaller subnetworks, have opposite meanings. However, Supernetting is used to combine a smaller range of addresses into a larger one in order to facilitate and speed up routing. These techniques are ultimately used to boost IP address availability and reduce IP address depletion.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q1:How does subnetting work?

Answer:

Subnetting involves borrowing bits from the host portion of an IP address to create a subnet mask. The subnet mask determines the number of bits allocated to the network and subnet portions, leaving the remaining bits for host addresses. By varying the subnet mask, different numbers of subnets and hosts can be created.

Q2:How do you calculate the number of subnets and hosts in subnetting?

Answer:

The number of subnets and hosts that can be created in subnetting depends on the subnet mask used. The formula to calculate the number of subnets is 2^n, where n represents the number of borrowed bits. The formula to calculate the number of hosts per subnet is 2^m – 2, where m represents the number of remaining host bits.


Last Updated : 20 Jun, 2023
Like Article
Save Article
Previous
Next
Share your thoughts in the comments
Similar Reads