Difference between Impact and Non-Impact Printers

Impact and Non-Impact Printers are two categories of the printer. Impact printers involve mechanical components for conducting printing. While in Non-Impact printers, no mechanical moving component is used.

Impact Printers:
It is a type of printer that works by direct contact of an ink ribbon with paper. These printers are typically loud but remain in use today because of their unique ability to function with multipart forms. An impact printer has mechanisms resembling those of a typewriter.
Example of Impact Printers, Dot-matrix printers, Daisy-wheel printers, and line printers.

Non-Impact Printers:
It is a type of printer that does not hit or impact a ribbon to print. They used laser, xerographic, electrostatic, chemical and inkjet technologies. Non-impact printers are generally much quieter. They are less likely to need maintenance or repairs than earlier impact printers.
Example of Non-Impact Printers is Inkjet printers and Laser printers.



Difference between Impact and Non-Impact Printers:

Impact Printer Non Impact Printer
Produces characters and graphics on a piece of paper by striking it is called impact printer. A type of printer that produces characters and graphics on a piece of paper without striking.
It prints by hammering a set of metal pin or character set. Printing is done by depositing ink in any form.
Electromechanical devices are used No electromechanical device is used.
Faster speeds around 250 words per second. Slower speeds around 1 page per 30 seconds.
Have banging noise of needle on paper Works silently
Dot-matrix printer, Daisy wheel printers, line printer are examples . inkjet printers, photo printers, laser printers are examples .



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