C# | Add an object to the end of the Queue – Enqueue Operation

Queue represents a first-in, first out collection of object. It is used when you need a first-in, first-out access of items. When you add an item in the list, it is called enqueue, and when you remove an item, it is called dequeue.

Queue<T>.Enqueue(T) Method is used to add an object to the end of the Queue<T>.

Properties:

  • Enqueue adds an element to the end of the Queue.
  • Dequeue removes the oldest element from the start of the Queue.
  • Peek returns the oldest element that is at the start of the Queue but does not remove it from the Queue.
  • The capacity of a Queue is the number of elements the Queue can hold.
  • As elements are added to a Queue, the capacity is automatically increased as required by reallocating the internal array.
  • Queue accepts null as a valid value for reference types and allows duplicate elements.

Syntax :

void Enqueue(object obj);

The Enqueue() method inserts values at the end of the Queue.

Example:

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// C# code to add an object
// to the end of the Queue
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
  
class GFG {
  
    // Driver code
    public static void Main()
    {
  
        // Creating a Queue of strings
        Queue<string> myQueue = new Queue<string>();
  
        // Inserting the elements into the Queue
        myQueue.Enqueue("one");
  
        // Displaying the count of elements
        // contained in the Queue
        Console.Write("Total number of elements in the Queue are : ");
  
        Console.WriteLine(myQueue.Count);
  
        myQueue.Enqueue("two");
  
        // Displaying the count of elements
        // contained in the Queue
        Console.Write("Total number of elements in the Queue are : ");
  
        Console.WriteLine(myQueue.Count);
  
        myQueue.Enqueue("three");
  
        // Displaying the count of elements
        // contained in the Queue
        Console.Write("Total number of elements in the Queue are : ");
  
        Console.WriteLine(myQueue.Count);
  
        myQueue.Enqueue("four");
  
        // Displaying the count of elements
        // contained in the Queue
        Console.Write("Total number of elements in the Queue are : ");
  
        Console.WriteLine(myQueue.Count);
  
        myQueue.Enqueue("five");
  
        // Displaying the count of elements
        // contained in the Queue
        Console.Write("Total number of elements in the Queue are : ");
  
        Console.WriteLine(myQueue.Count);
  
        myQueue.Enqueue("six");
  
        // Displaying the count of elements
        // contained in the Queue
        Console.Write("Total number of elements in the Queue are : ");
  
        Console.WriteLine(myQueue.Count);
    }
}

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Output:

Total number of elements in the Queue are : 1
Total number of elements in the Queue are : 2
Total number of elements in the Queue are : 3
Total number of elements in the Queue are : 4
Total number of elements in the Queue are : 5
Total number of elements in the Queue are : 6

Reference:



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